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  1. #1

    Can't disable UEFI secure boot to install Linux


    I built my first PC, but it features UEFI dual bios and secure boot. I then made the colossal mistake of loading Windows 8.1 Pro on it because various HTPC sites said it was the way to go... I had forgotten how much I hate my operating system telling me how to run my computer.

    I have googled extensively on how to remove Windows 8.1 and they tell me I need to disable secure boot. I thought I had found the answer on the "It's FOSS" website, but it displays an option that does not come up on my machine.

    Specifically, when I get to the "Troubleshoot" screen and select Advanced Options, I only have five, and not the six that are shown. There is no "UEFI firmware settings" option for me to disable it.

    I have a Linux bootable usb stick ready to go, and I want desperately to use it, but I can't get rid of secure boot.

    I would even be happy to format the hard drive and begin again, but I don't know how to do that if the bios won't recognize a non-secure boot usb stick.

    I even contacted Windows support to find out how to get rid of Windows 8.1 (part of that was to register with Microsoft how unhappy I was with their OS), but strangely enough they couldn't (or wouldn't) help.

    So if anyone can tell me how I can actually get Linux onto my first PC build, I would be very, very grateful.

    Thank you in advance.

  2. #2
    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    I think you are well and truly farked. You may be able to reset the bios firmware (how depends upon the system) and then disable the secure boot functionality, but there are some systems that have disabled that capability altogether. Since you say you built this system yourself, I would contact the motherboard manufacturer for help with disabling secure boot, and if they can't help you, tell them that was a condition of the sale and ask for your money back.
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

  3. #3
    Thank you, I'll try. Does this mean there is no way to format the hard drive? I installed a 120 gb ssd, which is where Windows resides. I'd be happy to take it out and see if there is a third party who could format it for me...

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  5. #4
    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    If the system has a DVD drive that can boot a live Linux image, then you should be able to wipe the drive.
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

  6. #5
    Secure boot won't let me change the boot order, which means I can't use another media until I eliminate secure boot. There must be a way to do this... And, I can't believe Microsoft doesn't issue a warning that a clean install of Windows 8.1 Pro is almost impossible to remove...

  7. #6
    Just Joined! sidzen's Avatar
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    Please give us the make and model of mobo, so others may avoid it, as well!

  8. #7
    Please understand that this is not a Windows issue. The fact Windows is installed has nothing to do with your motherboard's BIOS not having an option to disable secure boot. (Although MSFT did push for HW vendors to ship secure boot HW.)

    You can install Linux on a secure boot enabled system, but there's definitely more complexity involved and the distro installation needs to support it as well (limiting the range of distro's you can easily install.)

    From Google: how to install linux on secure boot

  9. #8
    I removed the hard drive and erased it. The system, which I built (before I knew what I was doing) is AMD A8-7600, Gigabyte FM2A88XN-WIFI mobo, MSI Radeon R7 260X with 2gb, 8 gb's of 2133 Ram, in a Elite 110 mini-ITX case, with a Corsair CX750M psu, and an H60 liquid CPU cooler.

    This is my first build (and nightmarishly small) and apparently I neglected to specify UEFI and Legacy, and boot priority before I installed Big Brother, oops, I mean Windows 8.1 Pro Student. And, after, you can't change the boot order without disabling secure boot, which is not possible on a clean install of Win 8.1.

    I now see clearly through the Windows pain, and am trying to figure out which Linux distro to install for what shall be basically an overpriced HTPC...

    Live and learn, and thanks for the attempted help...

  10. #9
    Just Joined! sidzen's Avatar
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    Food for thought:

    "Ubuntu is an open source computing platform ... Canonical is the company that
    supports it... " SOURCE: Partnering with Ubuntu and Canonical | Ubuntu partners

    So, there's canonoical, then there's Canonical. (And ... Microsoft owns
    OpenSUSE indirectly via a shadow corporation) Double-speak? It appears so!

    So, What else is new? George knew, long ago, that such is the case.

    Never give up & Keep up the good work!

  11. #10
    -->
    Whaddyamean "basically overpriced"? Go to MS and ask for your money BACK!! Surely there are legal aspects to this....? Guys? Any legal eagles here?

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