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Modems in general? They work excellent, since the only thing needed at the kernel side is a serial port driver, and serial port support is excellent in Linux. As for ...
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  1. #11
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    Modems in general? They work excellent, since the only thing needed at the kernel side is a serial port driver, and serial port support is excellent in Linux. As for the userspace side, I know for sure that the PPP daemon works very well. Then I don't know how well any GUI tools work, but that's another story.

  2. #12
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    that's interesting, all I ever hear is horror stories about modems and linux, but then again, most people that use modems at all anymore don't seem to use serial modems, they use pci.

  3. #13
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    Exactly. Those Winmodems are overflowing the market, and they all suck.

  4. #14
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    Yeah, I have some customers that I built systems for and custom made them as dual boots. Some of them did not have high speed connections which really sucked because linux is great with high speed imho.
    After a while, two of my customers ended up getting high speed so I configured it for them. Which reminds me of when I went over to a customers house and was trying to configure dsl on their computer in win xp and I had set everything up perfectly and ended up having to call the isp tech support which didn't really help but then suddenly it started working. It was really funny though, I set up linux in dsl in about 20 seconds while I was on hold, lol. It was fun telling the tech that it worked perfectly in linux so it had to be hooked up correctly, haha. It's always funny to hear the cringe in the tech's voice when you mention linux - people are really scared of it sometimes, lol. Ahhh, if they only knew! Too bad for them I guess.

    Dial up is phasing out anyway for most home users so the support is crap usually and soon enough there might not be any need for modems anyway.

  5. #15
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    funny... it just occured to me that i am in favor of an ati graphics card due to the lower cost of their directx 9 compatible chips. directx should mean spuat to linux, right? after all, it is windows specific. that said, do geforce 4 cards get along with linux better than gefore fx's?

    how about a via kt400 or kt 333 chipset instead of an nforce? (isn't it odd how a graphics chipset and a mobo chipset made by the same company aren't both supported well?...) i'll definitely be going the amd route. by the way, i'll likely be purchasing corsair ram, or maybe crucial. does this matter?

    the usrobotics modem i have does indeed have a controller integrated. i never bothered configuring a modem on the older computer i used redhat 6.1 on (it had an unknown isa modem in it). i'll hope for the best. and yes, the day will come when i get a broadband connection. when i bought my computer i got a $400 rebate if i signed up for compuserve for 3 years - which expires shortly. it sounded good at the time...

    the lexmark printer (usb and parallel connections) isn't a great concern either, as i will be buying a good photo printer (suggestions?) after i get a new digi camera (olympus 750uz). in the interim, if it will spit out some b&w text, it'll be fine.

    you guys are saving me a lot of time and frustrarion (not to mention money on hardware that may not work). i can't thank you enough.

  6. #16
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    The RAM is completely hardware controlled, so you need not worry about Linux compatibility there. Of course, if you want the most possible uptime, you should get ECC RAM, but I'm guessing that's not your greatest concern. After all, I'm getting more than 70 days uptime without it.
    If that nForce chipset only acts as a RAM bridge and possibly standard PCI bridge, you shouldn't have to worry. I don't know much about these nForce chipsets, but I do know that people who have been using nForce ethernet and other things that aren't rally standardized have been experiencing trouble, but the RAM isn't even controlled by software and the PCI bridge interface is to standardized for them to mess up anyway.

    I don't know about those GeForce FX's either. Isn't that nVidia's latest GPU? In that case, it should be supported by their drivers, because of their standardized software interface, which is pretty smart, I must say. I don't know why every manufacturer doesn't do that, but nontheless that's the way it is.

    When you get high speed connection, make as sure as possible not to get a USB modem, and if you must, make sure that it's a speedtouch one; I hear they're supposed to work well with Linux. The thing is that those USB modems always use device-specific protocols, and drivers are almost only available for Windows.

    I really don't know about printers and stuff, though. I'm really not into that sort of stuff. I just have an old HP LaserJet 6L that I know works, but all I use it for is basically printing manuals and the like.

  7. #17
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    to check out peripherals and hardware compatibility, see here:

    http://hardware.redhat.com/hcl/?page...lhardware#form

    I would have checked the camera for ya, but I don't have any camera software installed.

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