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Where does RedHat 8 by default install .rpm packages? For example, I installed WINE on my RedHat box. How do I get into the program? As you can tell, I ...
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  1. #1
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    RPM Package installs


    Where does RedHat 8 by default install .rpm packages? For example, I installed WINE on my RedHat box. How do I get into the program?

    As you can tell, I am a newbie to RedHat or any Linux!

    Thanks for any replies.

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    yeps same question for me

    Same problem, same question...


  3. #3
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    Interesting question... From it I'm guessing that you two recently migrated from windows to linux. I can imagine that Windows might have some problems finding their way around the linux directory tree, especially since I recently saw someone referring to a directory as a "folder"... Let's make this perfectly clear: there is no such thing as a "folder" in any operating system! If you have known such an element, it is hereby a directory.
    Most people that I know that run windows are used to organizing their data on the hard drive in directories right under the root directory (such as C:\MP3, C:\Program Files C:\My Documents, etc.). As Windows is basically a single user system, and even one such based on DOS, this is understandable and excusable. I did so too, before I removed it.
    However, as you may or may not know, linux is basically a clone of UNIX. In the late sixties, when UNIX (and MULTICS, its predecessor) was created, there was no such thing as a "single user system". Since computers of that time were rather expensive, almost no computer was used by a single user, and all publically avaiable operating systems were designed to accomodate an arbitrary number of users. MULTICS was also going to be one of the first commercial "time sharing" (as multitasking was called back then) operating systems, so it really had to accomodate multiple users at once, including security as a basic function.
    Thus, in UNIX systems (such as linux), applications usually aren't installed in directories where only they are installed, such as C:\Program Files\Microsoft Office (or whatever).
    Virtually all binaries that are supposed to be used by ordinary users are in either /bin/, /usr/bin/ or /usr/local/bin/ (depending on their role in the system). And that's only the binaries. Libraries (usually .so files, shared objects, the UNIX counterpart of windows DLLs) are in either /lib/, /usr/lib/ or /usr/local/lib/. Configuration files are in either /etc/, /usr/etc/ or /usr/local/etc/ if they are system-wide (applied to all users, can only be edited by some privileged user), or in the user's home directory (/home/<username>/) if it's user-wide (specific for each user of the program). Administrative commands and system daemons are usually in /sbin/, /usr/sbin/ or /usr/local/sbin/. Data files (images, etc.) are also usually installed into the "lib" directories, in a subdir named after the program.
    This means that if you install an RPM, the files are put into their "appropriate" directories. For example, the mozilla package install the program itself as /usr/bin/mozilla (the file that you start), some utility libraries such as /usr/lib/libmozjs.so (for javascript support), the skin files in /usr/lib/mozilla-1.0.1/, the manpage documention as /usr/share/man/man1/mozilla.1.gz (try running "man 1 mozilla" from the shell, and you get the mozilla(1) manpage), and some shared pictures in /usr/share/pixmaps/ (to be used by other programs, such as icons in nautilus).

    As for wine, you don't "get into" the program. Wine doesn't have any graphical configuration tools and such stuff. You have to edit the config files directly (as should always be preferred, since all UNIX configuration files are text files). There are guides on how to do this at http://www.winehq.org/, as well as guides on how to use wine in general. To start a windows program, you must run "wine <path>" from the shell (or your run dialog, or whatever), where <path> is the path to the windows executable. Wine can also configure the kernel to start wine automatically whenever a windows executable is run directly. I think RedHat does this by default.

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    Re: RPM Package Installation

    Thank you Dolda2000. That is very helpful.

  5. #5
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    or you can tell which files are installed where by `rpm -ql $programname`
    I respectfully decline the invitation to join your delusion.

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    Oh yes! I was going to mention that, but then I forgot. To make it more complete, you can also tell what package a file belongs to with "rpm -qf $filename", and get package information (such as what it's supposed to do) with "rpm -qi $packagename". See rpm( for even more info.

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    you know you dont have to biite people who call it a folder It's not their fault, and there is a decent argument for the fact that its just a name, i mean who came up with directory anyhow, its really just a special file. And for that matter who cares about files...

    If this makes no sense, ignore it. Its 3am and Ive been awake for over 72hours
    majorwoo

    Quiet brain, or I\'ll stab you with a Q-tip.

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    It's important! Directory is much more logical than folder. At least in my mind (although I don't speak english natively), directory (the word, not the file type) is similar to a table of contents, and therefore a directory file refers to that it contains a table of its contents, so to speak, which is _exactly_ what is does in UNIX. A folder, on the other hand, is something that you keep paper files in (as in one of those filing cabinets that you always see in american police movies, although I can't imagine that anyone actually use them anymore). A folder in computing is just another one of those silly, "user friendly" analogies that Apple drew in the 80's and that Microsoft plagiated. Therefore I am very much against the usage of the word "folder" for file directories.

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    A folder, on the other hand, is something that you keep paper files in
    see the point? A folder is a place to keep (paper) files.

    Since most people think of files in terms of "the place my data (aka text) is kept" it follows they are called folders. Most people think of folders as nothing more then a way or organizing their files, just like a file cabinet.

    Same difference
    majorwoo

    Quiet brain, or I\'ll stab you with a Q-tip.

  10. #10
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    Most people think
    Like I said, one one of "user friendly" analogies that Apple drew in the 80's, and thereby directly following that it really has nothing with computers to do. In order to learn something, you must first think in the right terms, as the old saying states (Platon, Confucius or me... same difference =) ).
    Please note that in the sentence you quoted from me it was the work "paper" that was supposed to be emphasized.

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