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I was wondering which partition format is considered best for installing Linux ext2 or ext3?...
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  1. #1
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    Ext2 or Ext3?


    I was wondering which partition format is considered best for installing Linux ext2 or ext3?

  2. #2
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    i belive ext3 is. not 100% but that is what everyone i know uses and its what most installation guides say to do.

  3. #3
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    Ext3 is a tiny bit slower than ext2 is, but it holds tremendous advantages.
    There is really only one difference between ext2 and ext3, and that is that ext3 uses a journal to prevent filesystem corruption in the case of an unclean shutdown (ie. before the filesystem is synced to disk). That makes ext3 a bit slower than ext2 since all metadata changes are written to the journal, and then flushed to disk, but on the other hand you don't risk having the entire filesystem destroyed at power failure or if an unwitted person turns the computer off uncleanly. You don't have to check the filesystem after an unclean shutdown either.
    Ext3 has three levels of journalling. Metadata (ie. internal filesystem structures) are always journalled, so that the filesystem itself is never corrupted. How ordinary data is written to the file system is controllable, though. The default option is the "ordered" mode, which causes file contents to be written to the filesystem before metadata is even committed to the journal. The highest reliable mode is called the "journal" mode, which causes file data to be committed to the journal before it is flushed to its final place, like the metadata. The least reliable mode, but rumoured to be the fastest, is called the "writeback" mode, which makes no promises at all regarding the consistency of file data. Only metadata is output reliably in writeback mode.

    So as for anything else, it's mainly a matter of priority. If you don't want ultimate speed, go with ext3. If you need the highest speed that is theoratically aquirable though, then go with ext2. For that to be effective you'll probably need a really advanced hard drive controller, though.

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  5. #4
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    Thanks i always wanted to know the difference between ext2 and ext3 since i came across it lots of times during linux installation (and always chose ext2 ). I am going to format my entire HD and i am going to install WinXP and SuSE 8.2 pro (on an ext3 ). I want to convert entirely to Linux but i couldn't fiqure out yet how to get proper greek support in openoffice because i am a university student in greece and all my docs are written in greek. But there is still hope and maybe the next version of Red Hat (X) will be the answer. Will just have to wait and see.

  6. #5
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    It's very easy to convert an ext2 filesystem to ext3. Just run tune2fs -j on the device and then remount it as ext3.

  7. #6
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    I think that even RH8 has good greek support, though. Was there anything in particular that you couldn't figure out?

  8. #7
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    I say use xfs. Faster then ext2/3, can recover journals almost instantly, and its a 64bit fs so it can scale extremely well.

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    Dolda2000 i can't open documents in openoffice.org written in greek with WordXP. Sure it opens them but i see rubbish instead of what i wrote. I installed fonts from my win partition and during RH9 installation i choose greek to be installed as additional language. Moreover when i try to copy a file named in greek from my win partition to my linux one i just can't see it or i get ????!???!??.doc instead of the name! Also when i try to print a webpage in greek with mozilla i get nothing on paper only the english characters. I installed greek support for mozilla and changed all the fonts in preferences to fonts that contain greek (at least in win).
    Any ideas? I am downloading as we speek SuSE 8.2 Pro. to see if i get any better support for greek since it is a european distro i think.

  10. #9
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    There's no telling how Windows handles greek, so I wouldn't rely on that. Maybe those fonts that you installed screwed up everything instead. The same goes for the filenames; just because they work in Windows doesn't mean that they'll work in Linux, since the codepages could be completely different.
    Did you check if it worked when you had a clean RH installation? Also, I really can't speak for OpenOffice; I don't really know how it works.

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