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  1. #1

    linux for newbies?


    hi guys
    i am fed up with windows and want to give linux a try! what version should i use - easy installl is a must (redhat?)

    I am a big time newbie so bear that in mind........as little hands on as possible!

    can u guys tell me some common linux terms cuz most of the stuff i read on here i am like huh?

  2. #2
    Linux User
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    what version you pick always starts a big argument

    I would say redhat, 8.0 is pretty easy to install and fairly easy to maintain - up2date is easy and keeps your current plus there are alot of docs out there on redhat.

    Download and install - you can come here if you have any specific questions once you get started. Good luck

    www.redhat.com has some install guides and such, but especially if you have fairly modern/normal hardware it will detect it and do it for you. A modem could be a problem, how do you connect to the internet?
    majorwoo

    Quiet brain, or I\'ll stab you with a Q-tip.

  3. #3
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    common linux terms. Hmm... I will add/edit this as I think of them.
    man page: is a manual page that shows up when you type `man $programname` into a terminal
    terminal: Kind of like the dos command line, only it uses different commands, like cp instead of copy and ls instead of dir.
    $anything: a variable that we don't know, that is specific to you. Like $path_to_file is probably going to be the path to a file you ask questions on, or $eth_card will probably be and ethernet card that you are referring to, that might be either eth1 or eth0 or something.
    ethernet card: It looks like a modem, but with only one jack in the back, that is larger than modem jacks. It works (kind of) like a modem, as it transfers data between whatever it is hooked up to
    firewall: a way to keep certain internet data away from your computer if you don't want it, and only let certain things through under certain circumstances.

    Feel free to ask about anything else, I can't think of any now, but if you ask "what is this" I would be more than happy to tell you. There is another place that someone asked what about 45 things were on this board, look in there, I try to be as descriptive as possible, and I think a lot of his had to do with networking.
    I respectfully decline the invitation to join your delusion.

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  5. #4
    Just Joined!
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    Be a good student too

    I have learn the hard way:

    know this first:

    1. file system structure (you will know where is everything)
    2. comands (linux console commands : copy, remove, find etc...)
    3. learn how to mount and umount works (it is crucial when you want to see your floppy, cd or even your windows partition)
    4. know about your fstab file (you will learn a lot with this file)
    5. be carefull with the kill command (with it you put an end to applications that are not running or are freeze)
    6. learn how to compress and decompress a file with tar utility
    7. and if you want to install free software here in linux you have to learn (it is very easy when you take it step by step) configuration, compilation, and installing.
    8. use logic, patience, and read the man (manual in the console)

    why I am telling you this, because the first time I tried Linux I was without any clue how to do things and I though this was a windows like system.

    Linux is a real beauty, who make you think and get satisfied with your computer if you care what you are doing. at first it was designed to be a server software, now it is a workstation one because it is free and many have been designing GUIs as a complement.

    Good Luck!

  6. #5
    Linux Newbie
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    Red hat now expect cash no exceptions I believe.

    This will get you support from experts should that level of expertise be required. Solutions are everywhere, it's just finding yours.

    For a new starter I have found ubuntu good because the install usually yields a successful result in all situations. The only issue is that the people behind ubuntu (canonical) have decided that they no longer wish to be in the spirit of this linux thing and are not telling their antecedents about bugs and fixes they have made. They are in debited to these individuals. Then just to make it worse they have decided their desktop will become defacto and have super-forked. This has upset many packages from which they've hugely benefitted at no cost

    Let's be honest more than one distro is good, but so many. Come on it's kind of worse than the world where there was only windows cos there's so much choice with no clear indication of what makes it special.

    Regardless of what I've said about ubuntu. I run Linux mint 17 which is ubuntu derived. On principal I plan to use Linux mint debian edition (LMDE).

    What ever you end up choosing get the most recent LTS (long term solution)

  7. #6
    Linux Newbie
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    *NEVER* have root privileges except for the fewest commands to perform your install or fix

  8. #7
    Linux Engineer drl's Avatar
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    Hi rhubarbdog.

    You are responding to a 13 year-old thread ... cheers, drl
    Welcome - get the most out of the forum by reading forum basics and guidelines: click here.
    90% of questions can be answered by using man pages, Quick Search, Advanced Search, Google search, Wikipedia.
    We look forward to helping you with the challenge of the other 10%.
    ( Mn, 2.6.n, AMD-64 3000+, ASUS A8V Deluxe, 1 GB, SATA + IDE, Matrox G400 AGP )

  9. #8
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    Yeah i had a browser glitch. I thought s***, that's a waste of my time. And an old post is current again. Thsnks for the note, but no more thanks cos we're both keeping this post current

  10. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by radman View Post
    hi guys
    i am fed up with windows and want to give linux a try! what version should i use - easy installl is a must (redhat?)

    I am a big time newbie so bear that in mind........as little hands on as possible!

    can u guys tell me some common linux terms cuz most of the stuff i read on here i am like huh?
    Okay, here's a summary: each distro=Linux Operating System bundle, offers something uniquely beneficial or annoying. Idea is to cater to your taste. Tastes span a line from want everything tiny and I do all the work, to 'do it all for me'. Most distros are somewhere in between. It's like going to the grocery store. Some stores carry everything under one roof. Some are like 7-11 or equivalent in other countries.

    So:

    Small Linux distros like Tiny Core, Slitax(sp?), DamnSmall Linux or Puppy, for systems with very little RAM that are long in the tooth. They are mostly commandline for that reason. If you like that style, a good distro will turn many commands into shortcuts you can either click on or use shortcut keys to type. Objective is to make commandline usage simpler. DOS meant to be like that, but never quite got there. Linux can be fun if only they organize the jargon and give you a bunch of shortcuts in typing.

    For example, it's kinda annoying to have to always type apt-get to download programs aka 'packages' (which I just used for the first time today, to download Crossover); or 'yum transaction complete' to undo a download which didn't finish properly, or type 'shutdown -h -P now' rather than just hit the power button. It's horrible to keep on typing 'sudo su' which looks like shorthand for 'superuser doing superuser stuff playing God, so let me in and here's my password'.

    So a distro which neatly arranges common commandline stuff like two-keystroke combos (alt s for superuser commands) or little F keys they did back in DOS days (F5 for apt get) , will be a popular developer among command line aficionados.

    By contrast and for a real newbie, you're looking at someone who's only known Windows for the most part, so now you need pretty pictures and (if you want to get donations) pretty smart and intuitive structures in your 'graphical interface'. Windows has always kinda messed that up, but more so lately. Its golden days of good graphical structure were between 2001 and 2003. I will use that software until I die, but it was by no means perfect.

    Which means, you still want to know the commandline, to bypass the convoluted graphical interface or when you bleeping can't FIND where in the graphical interface they put monitor settings (hint, they call it 'folder' not 'monitor' in the GUI, lol).

    So it's a matter of taste, really. Folks who want a minimum of typing (moi, I often sit 4 feet from my screen when not standing at it) -- well, they want a nice, clean, intuitive navigational GUI with ALL the options in the same place so they can watch Game of Thrones or listen to the next cubbyhole's gossip while they work at the computer.

    By contrast, a programmer wants code code code code because he knows how to type, likes doing it, and wants to just cut through all the bloat in GUI.

    So which are you? If a GUI guy, then by all means pick Mint, as it is the most turnkey. Next would be PCLinuxOS in that genre, though the latter still has some significant bugs. Actually, it's a better turnkey style distro, were it not for the bugs. But hey: no one's perfect.

    In the middle somewhere are the rest of the group of distros aka distributions aka bundled Linux OS programs, over 400 of them. I've tried maybe 20 by now, and most are wayyyyy too buggy for someone hooked on Windows.

    But then again, the 'desktops' (the GUI you see) are settling down into families: Gnome, Xfce, KDE, and the one I like least, Unity (barf). These aim to wall you off from Linux innards as well as provide you with a stable interface so you always do the same steps to get 'x' done (usually too many steps, versus command line).

    Good news is, the trend over the past two years is for EVERY distro to have one of those 'desktops' or often all five (PCLinuxOS has a menu of all five you can pick from at boot, very nice). So then you decide -- YOU not Redmond -- you decide what interface you want, and what distro you want.

    Happily, there's a little known trick to trying which I discovered AS a Linux newbie (I know only 12 commands or fewer) -- PUT THAT LINUX ON A STICK. Not some 'liveUSB' nonsense, but a real live, fully functioning 'distro'. How? The internet won't tell you. Like with everything else Linux or Windows, the secrets are staring you in the face, yet hidden.

    Here's how: find the distro you're interested to try, after perusing the master list of Linux distros, at Distrowatch (I made a spreadsheeet of them, three years ago): then find the site hosting the distro, find its download page, and download its 'iso' or 'zip' file. The iso is for DVDs. That's simpler. Find it, burn it to DVD using ImgBurn (my fav) or other DVD burning software, turn off your machine with the DVD still in it, get beverage, turn on machine again.

    Somewhere on that screen post boot, will be an 'Install This Distro' type icon or option. So now, go into your computer stuff and find a flash drive aka pen drive aka thumb drive aka stick, and stick it in a USB port. Be sure you know its capacity, and if you're really smart, you name it beforehand, so the name will show up every time you use it. So too here, when you click on that 'Install' you can DIRECTLY INSTALL THE DISTRO to that stick. Or, that external hard drive (60 GB minimum recommended, better 120). You do not need all the convoluted advice given about 'LiveUSB' creation. For Linux will let you 'fool' it now, into installing to that stick/external drive AS IF it were your internal hard drive.

    So when you do that, you're usually prompted for things like the name of your network, creating a user name and password (DO THAT or die, because absent that you can't navigate in Linux), for your timezone and whether you like the default formatting and partitioning of that stick/external drive. Accept any defaults it gives you, if you don't understand the option.

    Then go get lunch while it creates your 'package'. 30 minutes later it ends, prompts you to turn off the machine and remove the DVD, and you do that. Leave the stick or external drive IN the machine. Power off, get a beverage, power back on.

    Now you can play. And you can repeat the same steps on any distro you want, play play play play. Allow 2 days per distro you like to play and learn its structure, but 30 minutes for one you don't. Either way, after you do this a few dozen times, you won't be such a newbie anymore.

    Here's the advantage: you now have a whole computer in your pocket. Far better than those annoying attach-to-your-TV thingys. Almost any computer less than 10 years old (or for the commandline distros, up to 20 years old) can be turned into a Linux machine: just plug the stick in. Anywhere. Any machine. It's important, as Windows dies often, and Linux can then rescue it. So 'stick it with Linux'. That saved my many Windows machines many times.

    It's not easy. There is no such thing. I thought there was, and I'm sadly wrong. You're always going down the rabbit hole with Alice, in computing, but honey when it works, it's like Nirvana.

    So: did I answer you? Yell at me if not.
    Last edited by brainout; 06-27-2015 at 08:30 AM. Reason: clarification and testing post (forum timed out on me while writing, thank you for not losing what I was writing)

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