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I guess the main problem that linux is plagued is the poor support from many OEMs, such as Creative Labs. Some OEMs have excellent linux support, such as nVidia, but ...
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  1. #11
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    I guess the main problem that linux is plagued is the poor support from many OEMs, such as Creative Labs. Some OEMs have excellent linux support, such as nVidia, but most don't. And there's simply too much hardware out there for open source developers to write drivers for all of it. This will probably change with time, though.
    I might have changed my opinion on the best O/S for an average joe, though. I have long thought, too, that it's windows. Then I found out OEone and it's HomeBase Linux system, and, although I haven't tried it, I seriously do believe that this might actually beat windows. Please note that this is isn't for your average hoarder, but more for your average grandmother.
    I recently read, by the way, that linux has become second largest in market shares for desktop systems, when it became larger than MacOS. Note also, that this is market shares, ie. how many computers that are sold with linux pre-installed. I think that's pretty big. Microsoft still owns the market with 94% market share, though.

  2. #12
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    open source

    Dolda,

    While it is true that linux has suffered regarding OEM, I'm sure someone will write the code for it. I'd do it myself but I know nothing about sound technology.
    When I stated earlier that Windows IE loads web pages faster than Mozilla in linux, I was wrong. I should have stated that Windows load Java applets faster. I'm rather curious how they are doing this since I don't have JRE in my Windows machine. I presume they have their own implementation to reslove this problem.
    I suspect that once the "workplace" starts changing their desktops, it will be much easier for people to use it at home as well. Thanks to open source, I assume that this will slowly change as time progresses. The other problem is that people don't want to use a computer that is hard to configure. I'm actually going to complement Redhat for releasing version 8. I believe something like that will start to effect people on installing linux but still, I think linux will always be well loved by programmers and IT people. Please distinguish the difference. I think programmers are far smarter than anyone who can configure and maintain a system. =)
    The last thing I can say is that people want to point, click, drag and drop. They don't want to use the command line at all. I actually prefer to do everything on cmd but many many people like the mouse. Then again, all kinux distros are now very good with GUI event handlers so that won't be much of a problem but I also think that it may be hard to rid of old habits.

    bp
    The best things in life are free.

  3. #13
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    Everything you say is correct, except for one thing. Someone might not be able to write drivers for everything for very simple reasons. To take your example with Creative's AudioHQ, it is so that AudioHQ is not itself an audio processing software, so rewriting it has almost nothing to do with knowledge of sound technology. It only uploads programs to the on-chip DSP (Digital Sound Processor) of the SB Live!'s emu10k1 chip. So, to write a similar program for linux, it would require a kernel driver for the emu10k1 chip which has support for the DSP. While an emu10k1 driver does exist, it does not have support for the DSP, and the problem is that Creative has not released any documentation on the chip, so writing support for it will require reverse-engineering of Creative's windows drivers. Not many people are willing to do that, for understandable reasons. And there we have the main drawback of poor OEM support, namely the lack of documentation. In the good old days, you couldn't buy a single piece of hardware without documentation. Nowadays, OEMs write Windows drivers and are content with that.

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  5. #14
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    point taken

    Dolda,

    Wow. This shows me how much I have to learn about computers. I do see your point about reverse engineering. That would be a difficult and boring task. Thanks for pointing that out.

    bp
    The best things in life are free.

  6. #15
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    Yeah, for some reason the computer makers started thinking it was a good idea to ship a computer with an instruction manual that consisted of 38 words and 9 pictures, that is all. That was the first iMac instruction manual (give or take a few words). I remember when a modem would come with Hayes compatible command string references in it, not to mention great documentation of what chip was on it, and who made it, and what the dip switches did, and whether or not it was PNP.
    I respectfully decline the invitation to join your delusion.

  7. #16
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    yeah, if those modem werent 2400 baud i might still use one
    majorwoo

    Quiet brain, or I\'ll stab you with a Q-tip.

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