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Hi. I'm interested in redoing my computer with SATA RAID. I have a Gigabyte motherboard which I think has an Intel ICH SATA chip. So, here's the question: can I ...
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  1. #1
    Just Joined! groovygroundhog's Avatar
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    SATA RAID installation


    Hi. I'm interested in redoing my computer with SATA RAID. I have a Gigabyte motherboard which I think has an Intel ICH SATA chip. So, here's the question: can I install Linux (Gentoo in my case) directly onto the RAID 0? That is, if I had two 160G drives, could I see them together as one 320G drive and partition that?

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    NO

    No when you have RAID it means that both hdds are mirrored. That is, Whatever is on one disk is on the other. This is basically for when you don't want to lose vast amounts of data. However You can have two 160GB hdds on your system and partition each of them. But linux won't treat it as one drive. But once your system is up and running it is hard to tell you have 2 hdds. Hope this helps
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    Just Joined! groovygroundhog's Avatar
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    I'm trying to set up striping to increase performance. Can I install Linux on striped drives and do I set up striping in the BIOS?

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    striping

    What is striping???? I don't know what that is. Maybe somebody else can help u.
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    Just Joined! groovygroundhog's Avatar
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    Striping is where you alternate between disks when writing files. So part of a file exists on on one disk and the other on another disk. This gives (so I've heard) a speed boost.

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    interesting

    That is interesting. very useful and it may boost your speed. I have never heard about it but I imagine Linux has support for it. Is integrated into the hardware???? Or is it all software???? If it is integrated then you should have no problems. software.....I don't know.....You may have to get a new kernel. or build one
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  8. #7
    Linux Guru Flatline's Avatar
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    Striping does indeed increase speed, but it also makes it easier to lose data. I usually recommend a mirrored set of drives (RAID 1) with a hardware RAID controller or a RAID 5 set, which gives you the speed benefits of striping with more data integrity. Some controllers also support things like RAID 0+1, which is a mirrored set of drives which also use striping.
    There are two major products that come out of Berkeley: LSD and UNIX. We don't believe this to be a coincidence.

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    huh???

    How can you stripe and have RAID at the same time????
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  10. #9
    Linux Guru Flatline's Avatar
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    Striping IS a form of RAID. If you were going to stripe and mirror at the same time, you'd have to have a controller that supports such configurations. You would basically just be mirroring a striped set of drives, thereby gaining the speed boost from striping but still holding your data in a mirrored set...the down side, of course, is that you need a lot of drives to do that. That is why most people who want the speed benefits of striping with more data integrity use RAID 5 - since RAID 5 doesn't use true mirroring but stripes both data and parity information across 3 or more drives (similar to RAID 4, but RAID 4 uses a dedicated disk to store parity information while RAID 5 distributes the information utilizing an algorithm).
    There are two major products that come out of Berkeley: LSD and UNIX. We don't believe this to be a coincidence.

    - Jeremy S. Anderson

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    THANKS

    THANKS for answering my question......Now I know what RAID 5 is.....and what striping is.
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