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OK, so I have a problem... I've got a dual boot system set up (XP under NTFS, and ext3 for my Red Hat), and a slave drive with all my ...
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    Getting files from NTFS to Linux


    OK, so I have a problem... I've got a dual boot system set up (XP under NTFS, and ext3 for my Red Hat), and a slave drive with all my music, and stuff on it. I want to figure out how to mount an NTFS drive under linux. My friend told me that you can't do it, so I threw a 12 gig FAT32 drive in there, but it won't mount in either. Basicly, I need a drive that I can access under both Windows and Linux. If anyone knows how to help me out with this, it would be much appreciated.

    Thanks a lot.

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    Linux Newbie jamey112's Avatar
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    www.samba.org

    samba will do it.
    Today I fell and felt better, Just knowing this matters, I just feel stronger and SHARPER!!!, Found a box of sharp objects, What a beautiful THING!!! Box of Sharp Objects - The Used

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    Linux Guru Flatline's Avatar
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    The FAT32 drive should do the trick...what method did you use to try mounting it?
    There are two major products that come out of Berkeley: LSD and UNIX. We don't believe this to be a coincidence.

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    Thanks a lot!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Flatline
    The FAT32 drive should do the trick...what method did you use to try mounting it?
    Well, it should mount as hdd, but it keeps telling me that the path is incorrect... I'm a linux Newbie, so I don't know much about how to do this...

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    Linux Guru Flatline's Avatar
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    Could you run
    Code:
    fdisk -l
    and post the output? I'm sure we can get that drive mounted pretty quickly (look into samba anyway, though - it's a GREAT piece of software).
    There are two major products that come out of Berkeley: LSD and UNIX. We don't believe this to be a coincidence.

    - Jeremy S. Anderson

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    Quote Originally Posted by Flatline
    (look into samba anyway, though - it's a GREAT piece of software).
    I can't download it... I'm at school (No net at home)

    Is there any command or somthing I'm supposted to run? I tried formatting the drive as "vfat" when I installed Red Hat, but it said that it couldn't, and then it restarted the install... I can still mount removeable media (CD Drive, and floppy), but that's it...

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    Linux Guru Flatline's Avatar
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    As long as your BIOS picks the drive up, RedHat should see the device. That's why I said you should run the fdisk -l command. It will list the /dev/hd* detected on your system so you can see what to specify for the mount command (for instance, if you had two CD drives, hdd would already be taken, and if there's no media in the drives it would kick back an error).
    There are two major products that come out of Berkeley: LSD and UNIX. We don't believe this to be a coincidence.

    - Jeremy S. Anderson

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    aah, I see now... and when it lists the drives, how would I go about mounting them?

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    Linux Guru Flatline's Avatar
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    In most distros you don't even have to specify a filesystem type anymore, so the command is pretty simple. Say you wanted to mount a FAT32 partition that shows up as /dev/hda5 on the directory /storage. First create the directory with
    Code:
    mkdir /storage
    then mount the drive with
    Code:
    mount /dev/hda5 /storage
    If it asks for a filesystem type, you could use
    Code:
    mount -t vfat /dev/hda5 /storage
    There are two major products that come out of Berkeley: LSD and UNIX. We don't believe this to be a coincidence.

    - Jeremy S. Anderson

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