Find the answer to your Linux question:
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2
Results 11 to 16 of 16
OK, they actually seem to be using a specialized chip after all. Oh well, just install the kernel source code then. Like I said, there should be an RPM on ...
Enjoy an ad free experience by logging in. Not a member yet? Register.
  1. #11
    Linux Guru
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Täby, Sweden
    Posts
    7,578

    OK, they actually seem to be using a specialized chip after all. Oh well, just install the kernel source code then. Like I said, there should be an RPM on your installation CDs named "kernel-source-<version>.i386.rpm".
    This was RH9, right? I believe you can install it by starting RedHat's package manager. In RH9, I think it's called "Add/remove packages" or something like that and is located under the System Tools menu. You should be able to find the kernel source somewhere in it. It's probably the easiest way for you to install the kernel source code.

  2. #12
    Just Joined!
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Posts
    82
    Okay...

    I looked at what I have, and I only have the first two CD's that came with this book. It is very unclear as to whether the kernel is there for install or not. I found something looking suspiciously like it in /lib/modules/2.4.20-6smp/kernel. When I made a symbolic link to it from /usr/src/linux-2.4 it didn't work.

    Now I have found the kernel online and am downloading it now (2.4.9). I plan on putting it on CD-ROM, rebooting to Linux, then install on my hard drive by unpacking it to its own desired directory, then making a symbolic link to it as linux 2.4

    I do NOT plan to use RPM to redo the whole thing.

    Before I do these things, please warn me ahead of time if this is a bad way to do it, etc.

    Thanks

  3. #13
    Linux Guru
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Täby, Sweden
    Posts
    7,578
    That's a bad thing. The kernel sources must exactly match the kernel you're running, or you will get relocation errors. That is why you must either use the kernel source RPM on your CDs, or downloading another kernel and compile it and use it instead of the one that you got with the distro. If you opt for the latter, you might be in for a rough time if it's your first time compiling your own kernel, and 2.4.9 is very old.

  4. #14
    Just Joined!
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Posts
    82
    Thanks, man.

    Had to laugh.

    I'm gonna bag it now, and either buy a new boxed edition or just reinstall SuSE, even though it can't do my sound. Not sure which atm.

    I honestly believe Linux can overtake microsoft, or at least come close, if it can become more user friendly. I consider myself intermediate level with regard to ability to mess around with computers/programs etc, and I can hardly get off the ground. Most people are point 'n' clickers who would loss bowel control if faced with this stuff.

  5. #15
    Linux Guru
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Täby, Sweden
    Posts
    7,578
    I'd say that you've had more problems than most people. It might be possible that you have some kind of proprietary hardware component that Linux doesn't like.

  6. #16
    Just Joined!
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Posts
    82
    I also thought a little more about it. Most people buy pre-built systems with generic hardware options etc -- more easy to configure than the hundreds of different sound cards, video cards, NIC's, motherboards, etc there are to choose from when configuring your own system. It would be much much easier to configure and run if I hadn't picked out all this latest hardware.

    I do want to thank you for the help you've given me and the other newbs making a switch (or tinkering). It does make a difference that there is an unofficial support community out there.

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •