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I'm utterly confused. I've got a 17'' with 1280x768 res. Of course it can do higher but this is what I like it as....
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  1. #11
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    I'm utterly confused. I've got a 17'' with 1280x768 res. Of course it can do higher but this is what I like it as.
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  2. #12
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    Indeed, this has become very confused. I'll try to clear it up by being concrete.

    First of all, though: 1280x768? Are you sure about that? The standard modes containing those numbers are 1280x1024 or 1024x768. Or have you designed this mode yourself?

    In any case, the monitor's resolution (in DPI) isn't fixed. It depends on what resolution (in pixels) that you are currently using.

    To get concrete, it's important to note that the 17" measurement is usually the distance between the screws that mount the picture tube to the chassis. That's very stupid, but it's nonetheless how it is. The actual diagonal measurement of a 17" monitor is usually 15.9", if I remember it correctly. If we assume that your monitor actually has a 15.9" visual size (I believe that's the technical term), and that its width:height ratio is 4:3 (which I believe is the standard), then let me think a bit of how to get the actual width and height of the visual area... If the height (h) is 0.75 times the width (w), then the Pythagorean theorem yields that sqrt(w ^ 2 + (0.75 * w) ^ 2) = 15.9", which means that w = sqrt((15.9 ^ 2) / (1 + 0.75 ^ 2)), right? That should mean that the width of your monitor's visual area is 12.72", and the height 9.54". Does that sound about right, or have I done something wrong along the way?

    If I'm correct, and you're running 1280x768, that should give you a horizontal resolution (in DPI) of 1280 / 12.75 = 100.39 DPI, and a vertical resolution of 80.5 DPI. That brings you very close to 100 DPI; maybe you really should use the 100 DPI fonts?

    I hope I cleared all this confusion a bit.

  3. #13
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    well, it said there that you should set it according to your monitor. my montor is an old 14 incher. and i tell you man, it was huge!

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  5. #14
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    So, what values did you actually set it to?

    Actually, you normally don't have to worry about setting it, since it will be autoprobed over DDC if your monitor supports that.

  6. #15
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    i measured my monitor using a ruler, since that's what it said. then i set them to that of what i got. anyway, i set them to zero now, and everything's fine. i just wanted to try what that would do, and now i got that as a result.

    oh, to answer your question, i think i placed 13, 13 values there. and it returned a resolution of more than 11,000. i can't quite remember. but nothing was really changed. only when i opened openoffice writer. i tested other openoffice apps too and the results were the same.

  7. #16
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    13, 13? The values to put in should be in millimeters.

    Anyway, since it's working on zero, I recommend that you use that, since it probably yields a more exact value anyway.

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