Find the answer to your Linux question:
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 1 2 3 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 24
I dont know what model it is exactly. All it says on it anywhere is "Pioneer cdrom drive Super 32x". it connects to the computer through the biggest connection in ...
Enjoy an ad free experience by logging in. Not a member yet? Register.
  1. #11
    Just Joined!
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Posts
    11

    I dont know what model it is exactly. All it says on it anywhere is "Pioneer cdrom drive Super 32x".
    it connects to the computer through the biggest connection in the back of the laptop (12 pins accross the top, 13 pins accross the bottom).

  2. #12
    Linux User
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Minnesota, USA yes.....
    Posts
    479
    Is that the printer port?...im not familiar with laptops.

  3. #13
    Just Joined!
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Posts
    11
    I think so.
    I tried using the oldcdrom.img driver that is on the red hat cd. It seemed to accept it but then when it tries to access the red hat cd it says that its not in the drive.
    The cd works on my other computer so i dont think that is the problem.

    Any ideas on what could be causing this?

    Edit:
    A review of the problem:
    The cdrom is not auto-detected by either Mandrake 7.1 or Red hat 7.3.
    It is an external cdrom which plugs into the back of the laptop with the widest plug (the printer port, i think thats what you call parallel port) and is an old Pioneer Super 32X cdrom.
    I have done a fair bit of googleing for some drivers for it but havent come accross any.
    Any help would be greatly appreciated. thanks in advance

  4. #14
    Linux Guru
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Täby, Sweden
    Posts
    7,578
    I wouldn't bet that RedHat ships a driver for it. If there actually would be a driver for it, it would be a rather complicated operation to compile it for RedHat's installation kernel and put it on a driver disk. Are you sure that you are ready for that?

  5. #15
    Just Joined!
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Posts
    11
    Damn. I dont think i would be ready for something like that.
    unless there is a tutorial or something like that.
    Do you know of anything like that?

    Is it possible to copy a version of *nix to a folder in windows and install it from there? I dont mean like the Mandrake linux4win thing, i mean install from within the windows partition and install to a new one.

    If this is possible then i would be limited by the size of the distro as the hard drive on this laptop is only 4GB and windows at the moment takes up about 800MB. What would be a good (ie. small) distro to use for this?(assuming this is possible)

  6. #16
    Linux Guru
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Täby, Sweden
    Posts
    7,578
    That's very possible, if you have the hard drive space for it (you need all the ISOs on the hard drive), and a floppy that you can boot from. Otherwise, if you have a network card for it with which you can connect to the internet, you can install it directly from the internet using a boot floppy as well.

  7. #17
    Just Joined!
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Posts
    11
    It doesnt have a network card in it but it does have a pcmcia fax/modem in it. Would that work?
    Wouldnt installing directly off the internet be a very long process? (considering i am on 56k dialup)

    ok so redhat is not an option for installing directly from the hard drive (4GB hard drive).
    I do have mandrake 7.2 on disk though. It is only one disk and should be small enough to install from the hard drive.

    Also does anyone know of any installation guide books that come with a copy of a linux distro? I would like to order one in from the library and try a different version (whether i do or dont get Mandrake working).

  8. #18
    Linux Guru
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Täby, Sweden
    Posts
    7,578
    Sorry, it only works with LAN interfaces, and yeah, it would be slow over 56k dialup. That was just an option if you had broadband.

    Another thing that you could consider is if you could borrow or otherwise get your hands on another laptop, you could switch the hard drives in them and perform the installation on the other one, if it has a working CD-ROM. Swapping hard drives in laptops actually isn't very hard in general.

  9. #19
    Just Joined!
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Posts
    11
    I dont have easy access to another laptop and the screen on this one is cracked where it joins the hinge. (only the outer plastic bit is cracked not the actual display) I think trying to open the laptop would cause it this to break completely.

  10. #20
    Linux Guru
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Täby, Sweden
    Posts
    7,578
    The thing is that you often don't have to open it. The hard drive is usually placed so that you can remove it individually, without opening the computer.

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 1 2 3 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •