Find the answer to your Linux question:
Results 1 to 4 of 4
OK - I have figured out that I need to partition the 80 gig Seagate SATA to be able to have part or all of the drive FAT32 - as ...
Enjoy an ad free experience by logging in. Not a member yet? Register.
  1. #1
    Just Joined!
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Talladega, AL
    Posts
    83

    Partition size recommendation, please!


    OK - I have figured out that I need to partition the 80 gig Seagate SATA to be able to have part or all of the drive FAT32 - as Linux likes FAT32.

    Would someone share thier opinion (or experience with 80 gig) about the size of partitions needed? I saw one reference to having Windows in NTFS, and then Linux, cache, and files storage in FAT32 - but no reference to sizes.

    I have XP Pro & SuSE to load to start with. Actually I have already did both on the Seagate, but it all NTFS right now.

    Thanks for any and all help.

  2. #2
    Linux Guru
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    forums.gentoo.org
    Posts
    1,817
    If I follow, you have one 80Gb SATA drive and you want to have XP and Suse on it and you want to be able to share some files. Did you decide if you could or wanted to install XP on a fat32 partition, or will that be ntfs? If it is fat32, then Linux will be able to read and write to all of your Windows files. If ntfs, only reading will be safe.

    For partition sizes, if you have XP installed already (but plan to re-install), just check how much room it takes now and add, say, 25%-100% depending on what you expect to add to it.

    I can't say about XP swap. Linux swap should be 2 to zero times as big as your ram. If you have 1Gb or more, you may be able to do without swap....(put in 500Mb: you have the space). If you have 125Mb ram (sorry) set up 250Mb swap.

    As for Linux root ( / ) partition, that depends on alot (different strokes, different opinions...) but if you had 10Gb that would be a good start and may be all you'll need for some time. If you started to grow too big for that space, you could create an additional partition on your 80Gb drive or on your old 40Gb or whatever and then you could move your /home directory or your /usr directory to that.

    As for your fat32 shared files partition: only you can know that, based on what kind (size) of files and how many. Pictures take a lot of space, music not so much, text and web pages very little.

    The most important thing when partitioning your drive, IMO is this: you don't have to use it all right now. If you can only find use for 60Gb of your 80Gb drive, that's okay. As long as the remaining part is part of your extended partition (the "container" partition that holds all partitions from 5 and up, e.g. hda5, hda6, etc.). If so, you can create additional partitions as you need them.
    /IMHO
    //got nothin'
    ///this use to look better

  3. #3
    Just Joined!
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Talladega, AL
    Posts
    83

    Let me see if I understand

    So I can do a partiton for my XP (say 10 GB) and one for my XP swap (800 MB) - and SuSE would handle the rest?

    What if I did a third partition with the XP install disc - say 30 GB just to store files that would be used by XP and Linux. When I went to install Suse - would it install in what was left - and ignore the partitions that I had manually made?

    Thanks from A NEWBE ..!

  4. $spacer_open
    $spacer_close
  5. #4
    Linux Guru
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    forums.gentoo.org
    Posts
    1,817

    Re: Let me see if I understand

    Quote Originally Posted by BamaPanda
    When I went to install Suse - would it install in what was left - and ignore the partitions that I had manually made?
    When you install Suse, it should recognise whatever partitions you have created and you should have the option of changing existing partitions as well as creating new ones. At least that's the case with the distros that I have installed. In some distros, if you take the easiest route, that is if you ask the installer to make all the decisions, it will just install to remaining unused space, but that's not the way to go for most users including you. So when the installer asks (assuming it's similar to Fedora) if you want Suse to set up partitioning automatically or do you want to do it manually, choose manual. Make notes before and during about what partitions you want, size and filesystem type, including their "Linux name": hda1, hda2 etc. That could be useful later on. After partitioning, the rest is pretty easy.
    /IMHO
    //got nothin'
    ///this use to look better

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •