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i dont like rpms, actually i like but there could be some problems such as i need some other packs...so i dont want to mess up with rpms..instead what if ...
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  1. #1
    Linux Newbie
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    src.rpm installation


    i dont like rpms, actually i like but there could be some problems such as i need some other packs...so i dont want to mess up with rpms..instead what if i use src.rpms? again can i encounter with those packs. problems.
    Just a Newbie....Looking 4 Info....

  2. #2
    Linux Engineer
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    Why dont you like rpm?? For their dependencies?? Thats just a security function for all users out there so the programs actually work after they have been installed. I think thats a good thing....

    src.rpm:s is including the source for the actual program. With rpmbuild <rpm> you can build the rpm and the with rpm -ivh you can install it.
    Regards

    Andutt

  3. #3
    Linux User Allblack's Avatar
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    I have never used src.rpm. So when I download one of them I need to create a rpm out of it first? What's the benefit of using a src.rpm over a rpm? Can you compare it with a tar.gz install file or something?
    I am on a journey to mastering Linux and I got a bloody long way to go!!!

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  5. #4
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    the major advantage of using src.rpm's is that when you rebuild them you can specify the archecture. I rebuilt quite a few for Jamd linux which is basically a lighter, i686 version of red hat 9. It runs MUCH faster, but the big drawback is that even tho it comes with apt installed, it uses i386 repos. So to maintain optimization on it, I built my own packages.

    to rebuild one in i686, this command should work:

    Code:
    rpmbuild --rebuild --target i686 filename
    it may not work at first if you don't have all the dependencies. When rebuilding the source rpm, it requires that you have them for the actual build.

    for more info on this check out my Jamd linux guide which can be found on the link below.

  6. #5
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    now what i understand:
    there is no major differences between src.rpms and rpms if i dont have the dependencies.
    so if the program needs some dependencies i have to get them.

    am i wright?
    but there is so much dependencies i have to get .for example to install gcc on my computer..
    Just a Newbie....Looking 4 Info....

  7. #6
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    what distro do you run

  8. #7
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    gcc should come on the cd of your distro.

  9. #8
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    I use RedHat 7.3
    Actually i want to upgrade gcc. Some times ago i tried to install Mplayer and it gave me the error " your gcc version is not supported by mplayer" or something like that...so now i want to upgrade gcc..

    can i upgrade gcc by using source code? or
    if i use RH 8.0 installing CD can i upgrade gcc?

    (Note: i dont want to change my distro)
    Just a Newbie....Looking 4 Info....

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