Find the answer to your Linux question:

View Poll Results: In concern to security, which Distro LISTED (I don't think I'm capable of installing Slackware) is t

Voters
15. You may not vote on this poll
  • Fedora

    1 6.67%
  • Suse

    2 13.33%
  • Gentoo

    4 26.67%
  • Mandriva

    0 0%
  • FreeBSD

    6 40.00%
  • Redhat

    2 13.33%
Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 15
I had problems installing Fedora 4 (i386), but did a search here and found a answer/trick that worked. My installation problem started with booting from the installation DVD, before Anaconda ...
Enjoy an ad free experience by logging in. Not a member yet? Register.
  1. #1
    Just Joined!
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    5

    Why does this trick work?


    I had problems installing Fedora 4 (i386), but did a search here and found a answer/trick that worked. My installation problem started with booting from the installation DVD, before Anaconda got to take center stage on my monitor. One of the error lines was....

    <0> Kernel panic - not syncing: Attempted to kill init!

    In my searches I found that the line directly after this message was the important. In my case it was.....

    [<c01201eb>] panic+0x3b/0x1b0

    The solution/trick that I found solved the problem, and allowed the installation procedure to start was typing "mediacheck" (without "linux" preceding it), get the error, then typing "linux mediacheck". Shore enuf, Anaconda took the stage after that. Would it be possible to explain why this actually works, to a PC/Windows geek new to the world of the cute little penguin? If you question my ability to comprehend the explanation, just shoot me a few keywords that would explain it. Armed with Google, I can at least get a basic understanding of what's happening.

    I'm about to hit submit to this post and do some searching on why the Fedora installation didn't get too far, because it can't partition my HD. For some reason, it's unable to create a primary partition. I remember seeing several posts in my previous searches about partitioning errors, so I think I'll find my answer first. But hey, making full use of this soapbox, figured it wouldn't hurt to kill two forks with one spoon.

    Any help, guidance, suggestions, or just simple hello's are much appreciated. Take it easy. Laters.................10

    Sony VAIO VGC-RA826G
    250 GB HD / 2 GB RAM / 3.4 P4 HTT
    Win XP MCE 05 / Fedora Core 4 (hopefully soon)

  2. #2
    Linux Engineer
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Buenos Aires, Argentina
    Posts
    908
    First of, FreeBSD is not a Linux distro

    If you can't go for Slack then I don't think you can go for either FreeBSD or Gentoo..

    I'd say Debian or Slackware.
    serzsite.com.ar
    "All the drugs in this world won\'t save you from yourself"

  3. #3
    Linux Engineer
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Belgium
    Posts
    1,429
    Second, Slackware is not that difficult to install . It has a more spartan install, but after that, it's quite like every other distro around, except for configuring stuff and so .
    ** Registered Linux User # 393717 and proud of it ** Check out www.zenwalk.org
    ** Zenwalk 2.8 - Xfce 4.4 beta 2- 2.6.17.6 kernel = Slack on steroids! **

  4. #4
    Linux Engineer
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    1,431
    I voted FreeBSD. Yes, Freebsd does require a small amount of tinkering, but if you are good at reading man pages, it's worth a shot. Fast and pretty secure. However, I've herd lots off "freebsd 4.11 is better than 5.4" and such, but I only tried 5.3 and 5.4 so I'm not quite sure on that one. If you wonder about something, simply look through the freebsd handbook, you'll find almost everything there!

    Debian should'nt be that hard, and I beleve would fit well. Same goes for slackware.

    If you follow the handbook, gentoo should fit well too.

    I would say, if you have empty CD's and some spare time, this is a "try them all and make up your opinion" situation.

  5. #5
    Linux User
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    414
    I voted for Gentoo but I highly recommend you don't try it if you are unable to install Slack. Gentoo is not a friendly distro to install. I took over 12 hours for a stage 3 install and that's supposed to be the easiest. Then I screwed something up because I tried to rush through the final stages.
    registered linux user: 387197

  6. #6
    Linux Engineer psic's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Ljubljana, Slovenia
    Posts
    1,205
    Where's Debian? It's stable branch is great for servers. Out of the ones you have in the poll, I'd choose between FreeBSD, Red Hat (though it's not free, there are a few free distros which are made on RH), or Gentoo (though if you consider slackware too hard to install, you won't find Gentoo easy).
    Stumbling around the 'net:
    www.cloudyuseful.com

  7. #7
    Linux Engineer
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    1,431
    Quote Originally Posted by psic
    Red Hat (though it's not free, there are a few free distros which are made on RH),
    There is a free version of redhat (v9), thought it's pretty outdated now... But you have the whitebox and similar distros built of rhel's sources, I don't think there will be any major differences there... I mean, other than support.

  8. #8
    Just Joined!
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    5

    sweet, thanks for the voting

    coolio, tons of input on my poll, right on.....greatly appreciate it. first, i did want to say that i know bsd isn't linux, maybe i worded myself wrong, but i am aware of the difference.

    the only reason i assumed myself uncapable of a slackware installation, is because i read somewhere that it was meant to be hard, and compared to the difficulty of the game riven (which in my opinion was a hard game, definitely fun, not impossible though). anyweezer, maybe there's some specific distro designed by a sadistic person that i was reading about. i do have some spare cd's so i think i'll round me up some slack and bsd installations.

    i see that fedora got no votes, tied with mandriva.....that's poor company to keep. i'm not at all surprised by the newly named mandrake, but i read several places that fedora's big plus was it's security. maybe that was just as a workstation, not a server.....hmm, have to check into that one. at any rate, i'm ditching my fedora discs, i hope i made those multisession capable.....doubt it though.

    still on da hunt for an answer to why that trick works though. even though i'm giving my fedora discs a warm, bubbly format. i like my reputation of being a vat of useless information, so the answer is still a goal of mine.

    thanks again yall, know how to make a newb feel welcome. take it easy.

    laters.........10

  9. #9
    Linux Engineer
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    1,431
    Yeh, thats probably about desktop (selinux by default). Slack, freebsd etc etc can all be as secure if you simply setup a firewall and such.

  10. #10
    Linux User
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    414
    Though I voted Gentoo and I have Slack installed, I actually run a Fedora server. I figured it would be easier to set up than some of the more complicated distros. I have spent quite a bit of time setting it though but I'm not the most experienced user in the world.
    Next I have to set it up as a web server with Apache. Fun, fun, fun.
    registered linux user: 387197

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •