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By guru I just mean someone who can install linux, then make it work with hardware. Then install packages, patches, and applications. Set up a webserver, database, and mailserver. If ...
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    How many years will it take to become a guru?


    By guru I just mean someone who can install linux, then make it work with hardware. Then install packages, patches, and applications. Set up a webserver, database, and mailserver. If you've ever attempted to do this, there is a lot involved!

    I am just getting into this. Actually this is my first post. I'm sure there will be many, many more.... like I was saying I am new to linux...kinda. I've had shell accounts before, and done C programming and shell scripting in unix. I've even installed redhat, mandrake, ubuntu, distros on my computers. but I am totally new to setting up my own custom linux system. And it is really pissing me off to be honest. I thought I would be able to handle this, but everytime I look up an answer, I have like 20 more questions. When will I get to the bottom of this??

    Okay well, right now I am just trying to compile the linux kernel. 2.6.13.4. I downloaded the Full from kernel.org. And there is no src directory! I think I figured out from the README that I need to somehow extract the /src first by typing make??? Well I am using windows right now, so I guess I am asking would I be able to compile the linux kernel using Cygwin?

    So yeah this is where I am stuck. Havent even compiled yet. ehhh thanks for any help and wisdom you can share.

  2. #2
    Linux Guru budman7's Avatar
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    Been awhile since I compiled a kernel that wasn't a fresh install.
    But I believe you should have the kernel itself in /usr/src, and from there you can do your compilation.


    make && make modules install

    As for becoming a guru, how fast do you pick things up?
    Linux is one of those things where the more you know, you realize how much more you don't know.
    How to know if you are a geek.
    when you respond to "get a life!" with "what's the URL?"
    - Birger

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  3. #3
    oz
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    Yep, "how long to become a guru?" would certainly depend on the user.

    It works the same in Linux as it does in Windows. There are millions of people that have been using Windows for 15 years, or more, but they still aren't gurus. I've been using Linux for 6 or 7 years now, but don't feel like I'm a guru by any stretch of the imagination.

  4. #4
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    Q. How long to become a Linux guru?
    A. 1 Year, 278 Days, 15 hours, and 23 seconds

    That should do it.

    Jeremy
    Registered Linux user #346571
    "All The Dude ever wanted was his rug back" - The Dude

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    thank you dude. that answers my question.

    Well there is still no C code (at least that I could locate!) in the linux I downloaded today. 2.6.13.4. At least I finally was able to use make (after installing the make package) cd /usr/src/linux, typed tar xvfj /path/to/linux.bz2 and extracted everything, then cd linux-2.6.13.4 and typed make. Things started working correctly after installing gcc and make packages. Okay, then I was told that I need a configuration. I typed make menuconfig and get the error that I must install ncurses-devel in order to use 'make menuconfig' so instead I tried make xconfig and was told 'unable to find the QT installation.'


    God this is annoying... you guys... Isn't there a distro out there that comes with all the packages? haha, that would sure make this a lot easier. As opposed to dependencies around every corner!

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    Linux Engineer psic's Avatar
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    Here's some reading material you might find interesting
    http://www.catb.org/~esr/writings/unix-koans/
    Stumbling around the 'net:
    www.cloudyuseful.com

  7. #7
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    Most distros have package managers to handle dependancy issues for you. I know Mandriva uses URPMI. Check it out.

    Jeremy
    Registered Linux user #346571
    "All The Dude ever wanted was his rug back" - The Dude

  8. #8
    oz
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    Quote Originally Posted by hemlockz
    Isn't there a distro out there that comes with all the packages? haha, that would sure make this a lot easier. As opposed to dependencies around every corner!
    Maybe try Debian. It has thousands of packages, and it's easy to simply "apt-get install packagename", as it takes care of the dependencies for you. Another option of that nature with lots of packages would be Gentoo.

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    I'll try debian sometime. I am using ubunto 5 now. As great as it would be to have all the packages, I am really learning a lot of little things by installing these by hand. The kernel is now compiling as we speak, finally! I had to install gcc package with the ubuntu package manager in order to make menuconfig. Then it still didnt work and needed the ncurses package. That wasnt on the ubuntu DVD, so I had to download it, bz2 it, tar -xvf it, ./configure it, then make install it. Finally I was able to run sudo make menuconfig and at least get a .config file generated. Now I just typed sudo make and I think a linux system is being built! This is pretty cool, and educational. I think I can get into this....

  10. #10
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    try a source-based distro

    I might get some flack from others - but I started using linux full time several years ago, and jumped in with a source distro. There is a very high learning curve, but gentoo has very nice documentation (http://www.gentoo.org/doc/en/) to go along with the install, and lots of wiki's (http://gentoo-wiki.com/)out there to help with other issues. The other source distro I could reccomend is Lunar Linux (http://www.lunar-linux.org) - though the documentation for it is lacking a bit (or at least was when I stopped using it).

    The reason I say go with a source distro is it will force you to learn what is gong on. If you want to become a "guru" you need to know what is going on behind the scenes - much of which is hidden in the big-name distros (try building a kernel from the vanilla sources in red-hat, I still can't get it to work on RHEL4). It may mean struggles up front, but in the end, you will come out knowing a whole lot more about how the system works, and how all the pieces fit together.

    If you can afford a separate machine to play with the source distro, or at least a large enough partition on a dual-boot machine, that would probably help out. It does come in handy to have another machine that you can at least browse the web with while doing the installs with gentoo, otherwise you'll want to print out the install docs, which will take a bit of paper to do. The lunar linux install is more straightforward, and all-things-considered, I like the way Lunar handles initial install, and package management. But in the end I switched to gentoo for a larger package repository.

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