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Background: [Linux newbie] I have an 80G harddrive Decided to dual boot RH9 with Windows 2000 Professional Partitioned 4G for Windows 2000 (4G to cater for legacy bios-the "first-1024-cylinder" issue) ...
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  1. #1
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    After adding partitions "Kernel Panic: No Init found. Try passing init=option to kernel"


    Background:
    [Linux newbie]
    I have an 80G harddrive
    Decided to dual boot RH9 with Windows 2000 Professional
    Partitioned 4G for Windows 2000 (4G to cater for legacy bios-the "first-1024-cylinder" issue)
    Installed Windows 2000
    Partitioned 5G for RH Linux 9
    Installed RH Linux 9 successfully
    Had a successful Dual boot system...

    Problem
    The problem arose when I decided to make use of the unpartitioned space. I created 2 more partitions (under Windows). One for Windows Program Files and Windows data; and the other to share files between the two OS's (FAT not FAT32).

    When I boot, Grub sees both OS's, I can select and boot Windows successfully, the problem is when booting Linux, I get the error mentioned above. These are some of the messages leading to the error:

    Code:
    Mounting /proc filesystem
    Creating block devices
    Creating root device
    mkrootdev: label / not found
    Mounting root filesystem
    Mount: error: 2 mounting ext3
    pivotroot: pivot_root(/sysroot,/sysroot/initrd) failed:2
    Unmount /initrd/proc failed:2
    Freeing unused kernel memory: 116K freed
    Kernel panic:No init found. Try passing init option to kernel
    When I removed the new partitions IT BOOTED FINE!!! but when I tried replacing those partitions, I had the same problem.

    I was as comprehensive as I could be.

    I'm jes a newbie. Be kind please. If you help I would really appreciate it.

    Thanx for your time!!

    tinux

  2. #2
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    Re: After adding partitions "Kernel Panic: No Init found. Try passing init=option to kernel"

    Quote Originally Posted by tinux
    When I removed the new partitions IT BOOTED FINE!!! but when I tried replacing those partitions, I had the same problem.
    This is the part that I don't get. Could you possibly post your before and after partition table? In Linux, do 'fdisk -l' (that's "fdisk"<space><lower case "L">) to "list" your partitions. If you can't boot your Linux, you should be able to use your install CD in "rescue" mode or something similar.

    Except for the fact that removing the partitions fixed the problem, I would say the problem is here: mkrootdev: label / not found
    Redhat likes to use "labels" for partitions, where, for example, /dev/hda1 is "labelled" /windows, /devhda2 is labelled /, hda3 is labelled /home and so on, while other distros just call a partition by its /dev/hda2 format.

    When you boot and get the menu showing a choice of Redhat or Windows, press an up/down arrow key and then highlight the Redhat selection. Press 'e' for edit and you will see the "script" for booting Redhat. There should be a line something like this:
    Code:
    kernel vmlinuz-4.5.6 root=LABEL=/
    If you highlight that line and press 'e' to edit it, you can change that line to:
    Code:
    kernel vmlinuz-4.5.6 root=/dev/hda2
    Of course, you will put the correct partition number for your system where I show hda2. After the change, press <enter> to accept and then 'b' to boot. If it boots, there's your problem (do this with the partitions, like you want it). This change is not permanent, so you won't screw up anything. If it works, we can make it permanent from within Linux.
    /IMHO
    //got nothin'
    ///this use to look better

  3. #3
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    I really appreciate your reply,drake. I know its tempting to ignore a newbie.

    Before partition table
    Code:
    Partition       OS                              Size
    ------------------------------------------------------
    hda1            Windows                      4GB
    hda2            RHLinux 9                    5GB  
    
    Free unpartitioned space                  71GB
    Then I decided to partition for data and for windows program files and to share files between the two OS's

    After partition Table
    Code:
    Partition       OS                                         Size
    --------------------------------------------------------
    hda1            Windows&#40;NTFS&#41;                      4GB
    hda2            RHLinux 9&#40;ext3&#41;                     5GB  
    hda3            No OS&#40;NTFS&#41;                         15GB
    hda4            No OS&#40;FAT&#41;                           10GB
    
    Free unpartitioned space                  46GB
    In Linux, do 'fdisk -l' (that's "fdisk"<space><lower case "L">) to "list" your partitions. If you can't boot your Linux, you should be able to use your install CD in "rescue" mode or something similar.
    The closest I've gotten to to interacting with the OS was with Grub like you suggested, but unfortunately it did not work.

    I did notice though that in windows, there are two partitions not more than 500MB in total. I assumed that these were created by Linux on installation since I did not create these myself. I havent touched them.Are these '/home' and '/etc' folders? All I know is that I installed with the default settings. After choosing the root '/' i just clicked next next, till I was installing. Is Linux particular about the partition order? All I know is that after placing my new partitions, the partition order in Windows actually changed. I'm just mentioning these in case they assist you in helping me out


    thanx,

    tinux

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  5. #4
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    Is reinstalling Linux an option? If it is, then that will be the easiest course. Redhat can create your "utility" partitions and by having Redhat do it, they will be set to automatically mount when you boot to Linux. If you choose to do that:

    You should not choose to "let Redhat" partition the drive, but rather do it "manually". Red hat should then give you a graphical display of your partitions and you should be able to delete, create, set format (VFAT, whatever). You should have at least 2 partitions for Linux: one for "root" which is named / and one for swap which should be equal in size to your RAM, up to 500Mb, or up to twice RAM if you have less than 125Mb. Linux doesn't care what "order" the partitions are in.

    Very important: You cannot have more than 4 primary partitions (hda1 thru hda4) If you want more than 4 total partitions, one must be an "extended" partition which will act as a container for additional "logical" partitions. So if you want the partitions like you described, the following would be much better:
    Code:
    hda1       Windows&#40;NTFS&#41;             4GB
    hda2       RHLinux 9&#40;ext3&#41;           5GB
    hda3       swap                    250Mb
    hda4       Extended                 71Gb
    hda5       No OS&#40;NTFS&#41;              15GB
    hda6       No OS&#40;FAT&#41;               10GB
    
    Free unpartitioned space            46GB
    With your proposed arrangement, you would not have been able to use the remaining 46Gb!

    I don't think that Redhat will be able to format a partition for NTFS. You should have Redhat format that partition as VFAT or FAT32 or FAT and then use Windows to change it. Linux cannot safely write to NTFS but reading is no problem.

    If reinstallation is a problem, you should manipulate your partitions with fdisk from within Linux. You will then need to format the swap partition (mkswap) as well as the other 2 (mkfs) and then edit /etc/fstab to have them automatically mounted when you boot.
    /IMHO
    //got nothin'
    ///this use to look better

  6. #5
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    i didnt intend to reinstall the linux. i guess that's the 'expense' in linux as compared to windows. very technical as opposed to smple wizard type installation procedures. u need to read just to install. the 'expense' is in time used to climb the steep learning curve...

    this would be the fourth re-installation

    anyway, i jes gotta know it

    You should not choose to "let Redhat" partition the drive, but rather do it "manually". Red hat should then give you a graphical display of your partitions and you should be able to delete, create, set format (VFAT, whatever). You should have at least 2 partitions for Linux: one for "root" which is named / and one for swap which should be equal in size to your RAM, up to 500Mb, or up to twice RAM if you have less than 125Mb. Linux doesn't care what "order" the partitions are in.
    i did do it manualy, actually (rhymes!! ). i was explaining the fact that I noted two additional partitions or something in Windows. Partitions I hadnt created myself but which I thought linux would create as "system partitions" (shrug)

    If reinstallation is a problem, you should manipulate your partitions with fdisk from within Linux.
    but i cant get into linux. or do i do t through Grub? please explain. I've got the latest Knoppix, if that would help me troubleshoot.
    Very important: You cannot have more than 4 primary partitions (hda1 thru hda4) If you want more than 4 total partitions, one must be an "extended" partition which will act as a container for additional "logical" partitions.
    true! windows also enforces the same constraint. so it wouldnt even allow me to create them even if i was ignorant of the fact

    If reinstallation is a problem, you should manipulate your partitions with fdisk from within Linux. You will then need to format the swap partition (mkswap) as well as the other 2 (mkfs) and then edit /etc/fstab to have them automatically mounted when you boot.
    I would have gladly re-partitioned or re-installed if i didnt have data on the new partitions. It's sad hey? well, i'll try solve it. if all fails, i'll definitely return to linux once i've got somewhere to backup that data

    thanx drake!
    i appreciate your effort!

    cheers

    tinux

  7. #6
    Linux User twoHats's Avatar
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    Linux Expense

    Quote Originally Posted by tinux
    i didnt intend to reinstall the linux. i guess that's the 'expense' in linux as compared to windows. very technical as opposed to smple wizard type installation procedures. u need to read just to install. the 'expense' is in time used to climb the steep learning curve...
    Or you could say that it's the fun in Linux. The tech detective work is at least half of the reason i use Linux. Every time you do something you get another lesson. Awsum!

    Once you start you will never stop. You may take a hiatus, but you'll be back!
    - Clouds don't crash - Bertrand Meyer

    registered Linux user 393557

    finally - hw to brag about - but next year it will look pitifully quaint:
    Athlon64 X2 3800 - 1G PC3200 - 250G SATA - ati radeon x300
    circa 2006

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