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hello. I am a total n00b here so be nice... Project : Add linux (possibly Redhat) to my XP box. Specifics: 2.533 Ghz, 2-120 GB hard disks (master/slave), Master is ...
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  1. #1
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    Linux project - dual boot w/dv editing from n00b


    hello. I am a total n00b here so be nice...
    Project :
    Add linux (possibly Redhat) to my XP box.

    Specifics:
    2.533 Ghz, 2-120 GB hard disks (master/slave), Master is 65% full, slave is used for Adobe DV projects and is currently empty. Both drives are formated NTFS
    1GB, Firewire, DVD+/-RW
    XP Home edition, MS wireless keyboard/mouse hooked to USB KVM - 1 usb port used on machine for Keyboard/Mouse connection.
    I want to set aside 15GB somewhere for Linux

    Questions:
    1) I have determined through research that I would do best by partitioning my currently empty second drive (slave) with 15GB for linux, should I use something like Partition Magic to acomplish this? Once I have installed linux on the second disk do I have to do anything to my primary hard drive to dual-boot?

    2) Has anyone used Cinelerra and if so, what has your experience been?
    since I want to try DV editing in Linux, can I use space on the non linux partition of one of the Hard disks to store DV with it being a NTFS drive?

    3) I may also try aliaswavefront maya for linux (though I'm having a hard time finding the personal learning ed. for linux). It states that software requriremnets are RH 7.3 or RH 8. Would there be a problem with RH 9? - This is provided I can find or order a PLE.

    4) What are the risks of loosing data on the XP side?

    5) Will my keyboard and mouse plugged into my USB KVM work in linux? It is just the same as having a USB keyboard and USB mouse plugged into 1 USB port (I think).

    -thanks

  2. #2
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    1. All distros give you some form of partitioning options. You could use partition magic, but I don't really see the point. If you decide to use Red Hat you'll be able to make your own partitions wherever you like. You'll have to install either GRUB or LILO to the MBR of your primary drive, but you will not loose any data on the disk. I've never heard of people loosing data on Windows partitions as a result of Linux.

    2. I actually installed Cinelerra a while back once I read an article about the pros/cons of Windows, Mac OS and Linux. The interface colors were a little strange, that's about as far as I got with it. It looked to be very similar to other editing programs, Premiere, Final Cut ect. Writing to NTFS partitions is still very experimental, I recommend making a FAT32 partition to share between Windows and Linux.

    3. Not sure what aliaswavefront maya is, sorry.

    4. Again, I've never heard of people loosing data on Windows partitions as a result of Linux. Linux right now really only offers read only support with NTFS, so you can not really do much to it. In theory you could mount a FAT32 partition and delete everything on it, but you would actually have to do it yourself.

    5. That I'm not sure of. Linux has USB and wireless support, but I'm not sure about a mouse and keyboard plugged into one port.

  3. #3
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    Wow, thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. I'll be attacking this project sometime this week so I'll let you know how it goes.

    I did have someone tell me that RH includes a lot of bloat and a "frontend" as they put it. I will probably install ximian or kde as well, but I noticed that the requirements for Maya were RH 7.3 or RH 8.0. Should I go with a different distro or stick with RH? Thanks again for your help.


    -fireman

  4. #4
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    I lot of people I talk to have said good things about JAMD Linux. It's based on RH, but built for i686 and higher processors. Supposedly really easy to install (4 steps) and quick too. So that would be my recommendation, if you decide to install it or want more info check out www.easylinuxguide.com and go under linux distros, there's a JAMD guide.

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