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Hi, The scenario is this: I've been using Windows for quite a while on my HD-1. It is devoted solely to Windows leaving only 10GB of its 120GB empty - ...
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  1. #1
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    Dual-boot with W2K / Ubuntu on GRUB (SOLVED!)


    Hi,

    The scenario is this:
    I've been using Windows for quite a while on my HD-1. It is devoted solely to Windows leaving only 10GB of its 120GB empty - withouth any FS.
    I bought new, a blank, 200GB drive which was meant to be dedicated only for Ubuntu Linux.
    Recently I gave the HD a partition table and installed Ubuntu on it. Everything went fine and I had my Windows-HD unplugged at the time, so that I couldn't anyhow damage my Windows partitions.

    The problems started when I was about to make my system working with 2 HDs and dual-boot compatible.

    First I had Ubuntu-HD on IDE-1 Master and Windows-HD as IDE-2 Slave. (CDs were on IDE-2)
    I couldn't boot to Windows and I was told that Windows cannot boot itself if it's not HDA (i.e. IDE-1 Master).

    So went to jumperize my HDs and made it other way around. Ubuntu-HD as /dev/hdb and Windows-HD as /dev/hda.
    But then it just booted straight Windows, although I had applied into BIOS an option that HDD-1 was the second boot device (after CD) and HDD-0 was the third. That is to say that although Ubuntu-HD should be booted first - it wasn't.

    I decided to make 'em both master-drives on different IDE-channels. Windows-HD being Master in IDE-1 and Ubuntu-HD in IDE-2. Still no good.
    I managed to have Ubuntu-HD booted first, but from GRUB I couldn't make it to Windows. It just nagged about "Root (hd0,0) Filesystem type is ext2fs. Partition type 0x83. Error 13: Invalid or unsupported executable format."
    Linux could be booted again (although it gave me some very weird errors, but I'm sure they were nothing since I could get Linux loading.)

    I've been told about GRUB's virtual swapping ability which could be my salvation, but I'm not very aware what should I apply into menu.lst-file.
    If someone is so kind, please tell me how to do is?
    And is it still possible to keep Linux-HD as /dev/hda and Windows-HD as /dev/hdb and get both operating systems booted up with this virtual swapping.
    (About virtual swapping in here: http://www.gnu.org/software/grub/manual/grub.html - page 4.2.6)
    What to put in menu.lst to enable this disk swapping?

  2. #2
    Linux Engineer Nerderello's Avatar
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    have a look at the grub tutorial in the tutorial section of this forum. Two thirds of the way down you will find a sample /boot/grub/grub.conf (menu.lst). You will see the map function, which I assume is the virtual thing you're talking of.

    Nerderello

    Use Suse 10.1 and occasionally play with Kubuntu
    Also have Windows 98SE and BeOS

  3. #3
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    grubconf

    Im not all that familiar with Ubuntu, but since its debian based th following info should be OK...

    If you can boot into linux you can install grubconf (as root apt-get install grubconf (or sudo apt-get install grubconf I think in Ubuntu))

    Launch it as root (gksu grubconf I assume) and then edit as required using the pretty front end.

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  5. #4
    Linux Engineer d38dm8nw81k1ng's Avatar
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    the problem you have is the you unplugged the windows hdd when you installed ubuntu. if you had just left it in, ubuntu would have just overwritten the MBR with grub, found windows and set everything up for you. well, in theory anyway. like ajehals you can fix it with whatever he suggested
    Here's why Linux is easier than Windows:
    Package Managers! Apt-Get and Portage (among others) allow users to install programs MUCH easier than Windows can.
    Hardware Drivers. In SuSE, ALL the hardware is detected and installed automatically! How is this harder than Windows' constant disc changing and rebooting?

  6. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by ajehals
    Im not all that familiar with Ubuntu, but since its debian based th following info should be OK...

    If you can boot into linux you can install grubconf (as root apt-get install grubconf (or sudo apt-get install grubconf I think in Ubuntu))

    Launch it as root (gksu grubconf I assume) and then edit as required using the pretty front end.
    I can't find this (or any substitues) from any repositories I have. Neither on my Debian or Ubuntu PCs.

    EDIT: Found it from net and the maintainer of grubconf suggested using "Gnome System Tools" instead of grubconf.

    The Gnome System Tools (later: GST) was supplied with my Ubuntu 5.10. The "Time & Date", "Networking" and "Users & Groups" can be found from System -> Administration, but the rest 2 cannot found. Or at least I don't know how to start neither runlevel-configuration (not needed, though) nor bootloader-configuration.

    Since GST comes with no man page and 'apt-cache show gnome-system-tools' doesn't provide any useful information, I'm pretty much running out of ammos.

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