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I have a box with two sata drives in a striped RAID array. I'm trying to install SUSE - in graphical mode, I reckon it's my only hope! I have ...
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  1. #1
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    Install sata raid 0


    I have a box with two sata drives in a striped RAID array. I'm trying to install SUSE - in graphical mode, I reckon it's my only hope! I have created a RAID in the install, which is /dev/md0. I don't understand why and how the partitions suggested by the installer can be different on the different disks, surely everything should be the same? I would expect to have to create mount points for each partition, eg /, on both drives. At one point I managed to have /dev/md0 report as size 160 gig, the size of both disks added together, but at this point there was no space left to assign any partitions at all. Grateful for any help, I've googled and 'played' with it for 6 hours and I don't seem to be any wiser. I can't even find any simple info on partitioning hardware raids, not simple enough for my anyway!

  2. #2
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    Maybe the partitions need to be defined first, and I believe that the two partitions that you are using for RAID may or may not need to be defined as well

    I believe that Linux may or may not be able to boot from RAID, so you may want to set up the partition of root, swap, boot, or whatever first. You, I believe, may then decide to create a RAID partition from other partitions defined (not ones like root, boot, swap, or whatever). I believe that once they are in place, it may work

    I do not know, but I would not try to boot from RAID, because I believe that Linux may have problems with that. I do hope this helps

  3. #3
    Linux Guru bigtomrodney's Avatar
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    The partitioner is a little confusing in Suse. You will see all of the partitions - primary, extended or logical in a list. When you create /dev/md0 you should add your partitions to that. You should only see the partitions on md0, not create them seperately.

    Now for the bad news. If you are seeing the disks seperately it means you are either using Software RAID or the controller is not a true RAID controller. In either case you cannot have the /boot partition as a part of a RAID. It must be seperate. Otherwise you will fail to boot. The RAID driver will be in the initrd but you will not be able to read the initrd if you don't have the RAID driver loaded...

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