Find the answer to your Linux question:
Results 1 to 6 of 6
Hello! Well, to start off, I'm somewhat new to "linux" but familiar with SUN Solaris, etc. I dabbled a bit with Debian via Knoppix about 5 years ago, but then ...
Enjoy an ad free experience by logging in. Not a member yet? Register.
  1. #1
    Just Joined!
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Chicago
    Posts
    3

    Partion Scheme Recommendations (XP and Debian, dual hard drives)


    Hello!

    Well, to start off, I'm somewhat new to "linux" but familiar with SUN Solaris, etc. I dabbled a bit with Debian via Knoppix about 5 years ago, but then never used it again. I came across an 80GB hard drive last week, and decided to install it as a 2nd HD in my fiance's computer. I was able to load Debian (with a few minor issues here and there), but it's now working on her 2nd HD. She liked it, stating "it looks cool... and my web pages load faster". Good enough for me, cause I thought she would freak out that I took apart her computer without asking her.

    So, initially I wanted to use the 2nd HD as a backup for her main HD. She has a DELL with an 80GB HD, that contains about 30GB of music, photos, documents.

    Can anyone recommend a partioning scheme where I can have Debian loaded on the 2nd HD partition, and still have another NTSF partition available to backup her files?

    I was thinking possibly keeping the 1st HD as it is now (80GB NTSF), then partioning the 2nd HD with two 40GB partitions (one NTSF for a Windows backup and the other... well, whatever Linux uses, I'm still new). I wanted to use the Windows Backup utility to backup certain folders weekly to the 40GB NTSF partition, so she doesn't have to worry.

    Or is there another scheme that might be a little more appropriate? Also, what would be a good partitioning scheme for the 40GB Debian side? (i.e. /, swap, etc.). The machine is a P4 2.33 GHz, 1.5GB RAM, dual 80GB HDs, and I basically plan to use the Debian side for word processing applications, web browsing, some programming and possibly using it as a server when I start to work on my CCNA. Nothing that would require enormous amounts of HD space.

    Any suggestions would be appreciated from you Gurus

  2. #2
    Linux Guru techieMoe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    9,496
    An extra harddrive is usually the easiest solution. As for the partitioning scheme for Debian, you'll want a root partition and a swap partition. The swap partition on a machine like a P4 with 1.5 GB of RAM doesn't need to be any bigger than about 512MB, partitioned as type "Linux SWAP" if you use cfdisk. The rest would be your main partition. A desktop Debian install will need a few gigs, I'd say 4 or 5 minimum. If it's on a separate drive, just use whatever free space is left. Some common Linux partition formats are Extended3 (EXT3) and ReiserFS (reiser). Either one should do fine. The Debian install may not require that you actually format the partitions ahead of time, just that you have them partitioned.
    Registered Linux user #270181
    TechieMoe's Tech Rants

  3. #3
    Just Joined!
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Chicago
    Posts
    3
    Thanks. As of right now, I was able to partition the 2nd HD with two 40GB partitions. On one partion, I installed Debian. The other one, was not formatted. When I boot into windows, it doesn't see either partition on the 2nd HD, which makes sense.... since once is formatted per the the Debian install and the other isn't formatted at all.

    So the cfdisk utility can be used to format the unformatted partition to NTSF? Also, one more question, is it possible that when I'm running Debian, I can mount the 80GB Windows partition on first HD so I can listen to all the MP3s, etc. on it? I found plenty of information regarding mounting drives, so I'm guessing this is doable.

  4. #4
    Linux Guru techieMoe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    9,496
    Quote Originally Posted by gbovino
    So the cfdisk utility can be used to format the unformatted partition to NTSF?
    Honestly, I don't know. I usually only use cfdisk for partitioning, not really for formatting. It's NTFS, by the way.

    Also, one more question, is it possible that when I'm running Debian, I can mount the 80GB Windows partition on first HD so I can listen to all the MP3s, etc. on it? I found plenty of information regarding mounting drives, so I'm guessing this is doable.
    Yes, you can mount and read from your NTFS partition in Debian. I can't tell you how right off the top of my head, but I'm sure someone will fill in the details.
    Registered Linux user #270181
    TechieMoe's Tech Rants

  5. #5
    Super Moderator devils casper's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Chandigarh, India
    Posts
    24,729
    Quote Originally Posted by gbovino
    Also, one more question, is it possible that when I'm running Debian, I can mount the 80GB Windows partition on first HD so I can listen to all the MP3s, etc. on it? I found plenty of information regarding mounting drives, so I'm guessing this is doable.
    execute 'fdisk -l' command in terminal and note down the partition number (/dev/hdxx of NTFS partitions.
    create mount_point and execute mount command to mount partitions.
    Code:
    mkdir /media/win_c
    mount  -t  ntfs /dev/hdxx  /media/win_c
    your NTFS partition is mounted in /media/win_c folder. you can add an entry for it in /etc/fstab file for automatic mounting at boot up.






    Casper
    It is amazing what you can accomplish if you do not care who gets the credit.
    New Users: Read This First

  6. #6
    Just Joined!
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Chicago
    Posts
    3
    Thanks for all of your help!

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •