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Hi ... Things don't seem to work for me . I have tried to manually install Linux ignoring the ( /boot ) partition but I'am still getting the same error ...
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  1. #11
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    Hi ...

    Things don't seem to work for me .
    I have tried to manually install Linux ignoring the ( /boot ) partition but I'am still getting the same error message about booting Linux and that I have to create a boot disk

    I did so by manually selecting the free space and then individually creating the "/" & swap partitions .

    Please clarify as I am about to give up Linux for DOS !

    Thanks

  2. #12
    Linux Enthusiast Opnosforatou's Avatar
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    Let me see if I get it right this time.

    You manualy selected the partitions, formated them and the install completed successfully.
    (Ignoring the bootdisk warning)
    Am I correct?

    After reboot there is no bootmanager where you can select to boot Linux or WinXP.
    ---[ MS09-99896 - Vulnerability in All MS Windows OS ; Using Windows Could Allow Remote Code Execution. ]---
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  3. #13
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    20GB is not exactly ideal amount of diskspace for a duleboot but if you must...

    you dont _need_ more than one partion for linux but it is advisable to have some swapspace and it is also advisable to have /boot on a seperate partion. This however, is not strictly speaking essential.
    During the install process you should allow the linux bootloader to be installed on the MBR or master boot record (a small section of your hard disk right at the very start, this is to say - not any of the partions you have created) doing this will completly replace the windows bootloader (something that you never see as it's an automated process with windows) with one of the linux bootloaders (i prefer grub but use lilo if you want)

    Dont panic the bootloader you select will allow you to choose between booting windows or linux. If it comes to it and you decide that linux is not for you then it can be removed by deleeting the linux partitons with fdisk in windows and also (as someone else allready said) fdisk /mbr will restore the windows bootloader

  4. #14
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    Trouble using GRUB to load Windows NT

    Hi,
    I don't have a solution, but I have had similar problems, and tried a lot of things. I am becoming convinced that there is a bug in GRUB that prevents it from booting NT when the numbering of the disk partitions does not match the layout. I have experimented with various options. However, I realize I am just learning, and have a long way to go, so it may just be me doing something stupid. But I can't think of what! Here are the gory details (I know its long, but I tried a lot of things)!

    I really would appreciate any suggestions anyone can offer!

    I have an old Dell Inspiron laptop with Windows NT on it. I want to make it a dual boot machine with the Windows NT and Fedora Linux distributions. Unfortunately, I do not have the NT installation disks, since I inherited this machine.

    The NT installation is just over 8GB i.e. it just crosses the 1024 cylinder limit. I have an additional 10GB of free space after this partition. I do not want to reduce the size of the NT partition further. I cannot load Linux and make it a bootable partition after the NT partition because it is beyond cylinder 1024. The entire disk upto the end of the NT partition has the HPFS and NTFS file systems (no FAT). After reading on boot loaders and partitions, here is what I thought would work:

    1) Move the NTFS partition (an NT installation) out by about 100MB using Partition Resizer v1.3.4 ( found at zeleps dot com (since I can't post a URL yet!)), to create about 100MB of free space at the start of the disk.

    2) Install linux with /boot in this 100MB at the start of the disk and the rest of it beyond the NT partition. As part of this, GRUB was installed as the boot loader in the MBR.

    3) Modify the Windows boot.ini (using Capture). Modify the Windows NT boot entry to be multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(2) instead of
    multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1).

    4) Configure the GRUB bootloader to load allow selection of Windows NT or Linux. I don't remember the details of the commands, but it doesn't matter too much now since its redundant with some of the items described below.

    5) At the end of this, I could boot Linux, but not NT (just resulted in a blank screen with cursor in top left corner). I am not sure where the problem was. I suspect it could be in the way the hard disks are numbered, because the NT partition was still showing as hda1 and the /boot as hda2 though the /boot was located before the NT one. This is maybe the way presizer leaves it after moving the partition, and I am not sure if this causes problems.

    6) I undid these changes by deleting /boot, running the Fedora install to put it after the NT installation and then using presizer to move the NT partition back to the start of the disk. I also fixed the boot.ini file to refer to the first partition, and replaced GRUB in the MBR with the MBR written by fdisk. The system will now boot to Windows NT, but has no Linux. At this point, the boot loader on my laptop is the boot loader installed by fdisk/mbr.

    7) I prepared a GRUB boot disk and was able to boot into NT using the commands:
    title Windows NT Test 1
    root (hd0,0)
    makeactive
    chainloader +1
    boot

    I then moved my Windows NT partition out by about 100MB to make space for the Linux /boot filesystem using Partition Resizer v1.3.4 as before, and tried to boot into Windows NT using GRUB as before. This did not work although I tried numerous variations of the (hd0,0) parameter above. Note that the machine was not bootable at all when I did this, presumably since the Windows NT boot files (ntldr, boot.ini, etc) are not physically where they are expected to be.

    9) I moved the Windows NT partition back, booted into it and prepared a Windows NT boot disk using format a: /u, and copied the ntldr, ntdetect.com and boot.ini files onto this disk.

    10) I moved the Windows NT partition out by 100 MB again, and was able to boot into it using the newly prepared Windows NT boot disk. I had to specify the first partition on the first HD to be able to do this in the boot.ini file:
    multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)\WINNT="NT, First harddisk, first partition" /sos

    11) I installed Linux (Fedora) with /boot in the 100MB free at the start of the disk, and the rest of it beyond the Windows NT. I replaced the laptop boot loader with GRUB. I was able to boot into Linux when I did this. However, I still cannot boot into Windows NT with GRUB. I see the GRUB commands and then just a black screen with the cursor in the top left.

    12) It seems to me that GRUB is not able to chainload the ntldr if the Windows partition is not at the start of the disk, because I do not see any of the options in my boot.ini ever show up. I am not sure why this should be. It may have something to do with the way my partitions are numbered after Partition Resizer v1.3.4 moved them - they are not sequential by location - instead they are sequential by creation order. Running parted produces an error about not being able to align the partition properly and shows the following geometry. As you can see, partitions 1 and 2 are not numbered in the same order as their location on the disk. I do not know if this causes GRUB any heartache, but the NT loader seems to do fine with it.

    Disk geometry for /dev/hda: 0.000-19077.187 megabytes
    Disk label type: msdos
    Minor Start End Type Filesystem Flags
    2 0.031 101.975 primary ext3
    1 102.006 8103.098 primary ntfs boot
    3 8103.098 18567.312 primary ext3
    4 18567.312 19077.187 extended lba
    5 18567.343 19077.187 logical linux-swap

    13) I can't think of what else to try with GRUB. My grub.conf is attached, and none of these options work. I guess the next thing I will try is to see if I can boot into Linux from my NT boot disk. If that works, I guess I could copy the NT loader to the MBR and use it to boot both systems. But this defeats the intention - I WANT to be able to use GRUB to boot both systems, because that is GRUB's stated purpose (Grand UNIFIED Boot Loader!). If it cannot do so, it is a bug and needs to be fixed. I am also uncomfortable with having to rely on a proprietary tool to allow me to use linux and another system on the same machine, more from the principle than anything else.

    14) I NEED HELP! Any suggestions welcome.

  5. #15
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    One more thing - my two cents for raedaljarrah based on:
    raedaljarrah
    I have a PC with a single 20 GB HDD (as /dev/hda ) .
    The HDD is partitioned as follows :

    C:\ With Windows XP ( NTFS ) ( as /dev/hda1 )
    D:\ Data ( NTFS )

    The rest of the HDD is 8 GBytes of Unpartitioned ( Free ) space and is left for Red Hat Linux 9.0
    From this, I gather that your Windows XP takes up 12 GB of your disk and the Linux has to be installed after that. This means the Linux will be after cylinder 1024 (approx 8GB). This is similar to my situation. From my research, you may or may not be able to do this, depending on your hardware. If you have a newer BIOS, you should be able to do this using LBA (logical block addressing). If you have older hardware, this won't be possible. Don't ask me HOW to do this using LBA - I have not ventured there. I am just summarizing my understanding from what I have read.

    If your BIOS does not support LBA, I think you are exactly in the same situation I am in, and you have no choice but to move your Windows partition to make space for your Linux boot partition within the first 8GB. Read my post for details on how I accomplished that.

    Take my comments with a grain of salt though. I am a newbie too, and may not know what I am talking about. Don't know whether this helps you or not. Hope it does.

  6. #16
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    Oops - one more thing. Here is my grub.conf for whatever it is worth. This will boot up my linux, but none of the options to boot up NT work.

    =========Here is my grub.conf===========
    # grub.conf generated by anaconda
    #
    # Note that you do not have to rerun grub after making changes to this file
    # NOTICE: You have a /boot partition. This means that
    # all kernel and initrd paths are relative to /boot/, eg.
    # root (hd0,0)
    # kernel /vmlinuz-version ro root=/dev/hda2
    # initrd /initrd-version.img
    #boot=/dev/hda
    default=0
    timeout=10
    splashimage=(fd0)/boot/grub/splash.xpm.gz
    title Fedora Core (2.4.22-1.2188.nptl)
    root (hd0,0)
    kernel /vmlinuz-2.4.22-1.2188.nptl ro root=LABEL=/ hdd=ide-scsi rhgb
    initrd /initrd-2.4.22-1.2188.nptl.img
    title Windows NT Test 1
    root (hd0,0)
    makeactive
    chainloader +1
    boot
    title Windows NT Test 2
    root (hd0,1)
    makeactive
    chainloader +1
    boot
    title Windows NT Test 3
    rootnoverify (hd0,0)
    makeactive
    chainloader +1
    boot
    title Windows NT Test 4
    rootnoverify (hd0,1)
    makeactive
    chainloader +1
    boot

    =========End of my grub.conf===========

  7. #17
    Linux Enthusiast Opnosforatou's Avatar
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    That's not so weird.
    Take a close look at the boot options:
    Your linux distro is at hd(0,0)
    and you are also trying to boot serveral NT partition located at hd(0,0)
    And 2 at hd(0,1)

    title Windows NT Test 1
    root (hd0,0)

    title Windows NT Test 2
    root (hd0,1)

    title Windows NT Test 3
    rootnoverify (hd0,0)

    title Windows NT Test 4
    rootnoverify (hd0,1)
    Do you know what partitions you did install all those NT workstation(s)s/server(s)
    Isn't it an idea to dump all those and install VMWare and use that to run multiple NT installations .....
    ---[ MS09-99896 - Vulnerability in All MS Windows OS ; Using Windows Could Allow Remote Code Execution. ]---
    Hardware: Asus P4P800, 1GB, P4-3Ghz, Asus V9950, Maxtor ATA HD\'s, 3Com GBit lan, Audigy ZS Plat.

  8. #18
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    In windows XP, the command you need to remove grub is NOT fdisk /mbr anymore!! It is fixmbr and fixboot. I think, but am not certain, that fixmbr removes the grub and fixboot restores the windows boot loader. I usually just use them both to be sure.

    So the old 1024 cylinder limit raises its ugly head yet again? If you have a version of partition magic that supports Linux partitions you can just move Windows over about 32 meg or so to make room for a Linux /boot partition at the beginning of the disk. All your windows will still work, no partition letter changes, because it doesn't understand the Linux partition and won't count it.

  9. #19
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    Opnosforatou
    That's not so weird.
    Take a close look at the boot options:
    Your linux distro is at hd(0,0)
    and you are also trying to boot serveral NT partition located at hd(0,0)
    And 2 at hd(0,1)
    I don't have that many NTs! I have only one. I put those different options in my grub.conf to try different things to boot it up. This let me select different options and keep a record of what I tried instead of typing the stuff in. As soon as I can get it to boot, I can delete the rest.

    Sorry about the confusion.

  10. #20
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    cathyy
    So the old 1024 cylinder limit raises its ugly head yet again? If you have a version of partition magic that supports Linux partitions you can just move Windows over about 32 meg or so to make room for a Linux /boot partition at the beginning of the disk. All your windows will still work, no partition letter changes, because it doesn't understand the Linux partition and won't count it.
    I don't have partition magic, but I did just that using Partition Resizer v1.34 (from www.zeleps.com). I moved it out by 100MB instead of 32MB, but the principle is the same. However, I cannot get GRUB to boot Windows NT now, though I can boot Windows NT from an NT boot floppy with ntldr. See the rest of my post for the details.

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