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  1. #11
    Super Moderator devils casper's Avatar
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    is there any particular reason for using LVM only?
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    Only four primary partitions?

    What else if only four primary partitions are allowed? Is there another way to install multiple distros?

  3. #13
    Super Moderator devils casper's Avatar
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    you can create a simple Windows Extended Partition using GParted LiveCD or any other Partition Manager.

    i have Windows + 4 Linux distros installed in my test machine.
    here is the output of fdisk -l command from my test machine.
    /dev/sda1 * 1 1305 10482381 7 HPFS/NTFS
    /dev/sda2 1306 9729 67665780 f W95 Ext'd (LBA)
    /dev/sda5 1306 3263 15727603+ b W95 FAT32
    /dev/sda6 3264 4568 10482381 b W95 FAT32
    /dev/sda7 4569 4664 771088+ 82 Linux swap / Solaris
    /dev/sda8 4665 5708 8385898+ 83 Linux
    /dev/sda9 5709 7013 10482381 83 Linux
    /dev/sda10 7014 7666 5245191 83 Linux
    /dev/sda11 7667 9102 11534638+ 83 Linux
    1 Primary, 1 Extended and 7 Logical Partitions inside Extended. you can create 63 Logical Partitions in an Extended Partition.
    there is a lot of free space available in my disk and i am planning to install two more distro this weekend.
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    Documentation

    For a newbie like me, without tutor, it is hard to get documentation in an orderly fashion. I, obviously mistakenly, believed that the choice was either primary or LVM. From your reply I understand that logical partitions and LVM are not synonymous.

    In my case, fdisk -l tells me:

    Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
    /dev/sda1 * 1 13 104391 83 Linux
    /dev/sda2 14 275 2104515 82 Linux swap / Solaris
    /dev/sda3 276 798 4200997+ 83 Linux
    /dev/sda4 799 18136 139267485 f W95 Ext'd (LBA)
    /dev/sda5 799 4623 30724281 8e Linux LVM
    /dev/sda6 4624 8447 30716248+ 8e Linux LVM

    My question for the moment is: how to create a logical volume like you do which is not LVM in order to store different distros on them, all with their own /root?

    Sorry for my newbie questions.

  5. #15
    Super Moderator devils casper's Avatar
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    My question for the moment is: how to create a logical volume like you do which is not LVM in order to store different distros on them, all with their own /root?
    you dont have to do anything special. i suggest you to use GParted LiveCD for partitioning. its one of the best partition manager with very user friendly Graphical Interface.
    right click on free space inside Extended Partition, select Create New, Logical.
    Format new partition in ext3 filesystem. during installation of any distro, select newly created partition in Partition Section and assign / (root) Mount Point to it.

    you can execute 'cfdisk' as root to create new Logical Partition inside Extended and format it using mkfs.ext3 command. check manuals of both commands.
    man cfdisk
    man mkfs

    i would suggest you to try GParted LiveCD at least once.
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    Gparted & more

    I already had Gparted and used it before, but decided to use it now the way you suggested. I made the partitions, no LVM this time, and installed F7 and SuSE 10.2 without hassle. Dual boot? No problem, now.

    In the past, I used qtparted to resize an already installed Windows XP OS in order to add a Linux distro. qtparted not only resized the Windoze partition, but 'under water' also made the modifications needed to keep XP running. That's what it's supposed to do and, indeed, it did.

    Do you happen to know if Gparted is capable of doing the same thing, i.e. resizing the Windows partition PLUS keeping it working?

    Thanx for helping out.

  7. #17
    Super Moderator devils casper's Avatar
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    Do you happen to know if Gparted is capable of doing the same thing, i.e. resizing the Windows partition PLUS keeping it working?
    GParted and Qtparted are two different front ends of package 'parted'.
    GParted is Gtk based and QtParted is Qt based.
    both have exactly same capabilities. these two differ in GUI only.
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    Debian & swap

    When I installed Debian 4.0 r0 i3 as an additional distro, at some point of the installation I had to choose Yes or No when it said there was no swap partition. I chose No, thinking that would stop the installation process, but the installation went on. Debian is working.

    I do have a primary swap partition that was recognized by my other distros (F7, SuSE 10.2, Ubuntu 7.04) during installation, but which was rejected or not recognized by Debian.

    Question: how can I check if Debian uses my swap partition and how can I force it to use it if it doesn't do so already?

    Thanx in advance for your help.

  9. #19
    Super Moderator devils casper's Avatar
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    check this contents of /etc/fstab file. is there any partition marked as swap?
    execute 'free' command too.
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  10. #20
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    Mount point: none

    This is what Debian's /etc/fstab file looks like:

    # /etc/fstab: static file system information.
    #
    # <file system> <mount point> <type> <options> <dump> <pass>
    proc /proc proc defaults 0 0
    /dev/hda8 / ext3 defaults,errors=remount-ro 0 1
    /dev/hda3 none swap sw 0 0
    /dev/hdb /media/cdrom0 udf,iso9660 user,noauto 0 0
    /dev/fd0 /media/floppy0 auto rw,user,noauto 0 0

    As you see, the mount point for the swap partition (hda3) is none. I have changed this line and now it looks like:

    /dev/hda3 swap swap sw 0 0

    In Terminal I executed the 'free' command. Among other things I got:

    Swap: 2096472 0 2096472

    The figure 2096472 is close to what I get executing 'fdisk -l' (2096482), so I assume the Swap shown for 'free' is the partition, not some swap file.

    Thanx once again.

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