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Hi, All, I have been using LINUX for several years, but only for daily use. During these days, I also want to know how it works. So I read some ...
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  1. #1
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    How to improve my skills?


    Hi, All,
    I have been using LINUX for several years, but only for daily use. During these days, I also want to know how it works. So I read some books such as <<Understanding the linux kernel>>,
    <<Linux Device Driver>>, etc, But I didn't have a deep understanding about them.
    And Now I wonder how could I do to improve my skills? Keeping on reading the source code?
    I'm so tired for it's large source code , it makes me feel that I don't know to read which part...

    Thanks!

  2. #2
    Linux Engineer GNU-Fan's Avatar
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    I don't think even the kernel hackers understand every aspect of the kernel, so don't worry

    What I can tell you is that you forget things quickly if you don't apply new knowledge.

    So my recommendation is to specialize and focus on smaller parts. Not only by reading, but actually hack things of your interest.
    Debian GNU/Linux -- You know you want it.

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    Just Joined! pmcoleman's Avatar
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    I would tend to steer someone who wants to know more about the inner workings of Linux by suggesting some reading on more advanced user levels. I too used Linux for a period of time before I started to really dig further to understand how the system works. Using the system by reading advanced topics and then applying them has served me better than simply reading, especially about the kernel.

    To this end, I would recommend books like:
    1. CompTIa Linux+ Certification Study Guide, by Robb Tracy. There are a number of topics in it that will broaden your understanding of the Linux system and Linux networking. I found it valuable even though I did find a number of typos. Critical reading helps here.

    2. A Practical Guide to Linux Commands, Editors, and Shell programming. by Sobell. This one also has some advanced topics that will also guide you deeper into the system. Also it is just chock full of shell programing which will then give you a better understanding about the system itself.

    3. Bullet Proof Linux by Gottleber. Fantastic, more personal read that jump started me into learning more about Linux/Unix. While reading this work, I gained more confidence to jump off into the deep end.

    I think reading kernel books would be less productive in the long run if the advanced user and administrator topics are not learned first.
    Last edited by pmcoleman; 02-28-2009 at 10:17 PM. Reason: typo correction

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    Linux Enthusiast L4Linux's Avatar
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    Instead of reading a book about the kernel, I would suggest to start using a more "hardcore" distro (am I using the term correctly...? please correct me), such as Slackware or Gentoo. And after you feel comfortable with them (I guess it will take you some time),try Linux From Scratch.

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    Yes, thanks. And I have read most of the book which named A Practical Guide to Linux Commands, Editors, and Shell programming . What you said is really right and I'll read some advanced topics and implement them.
    And I'll read less book about kernel now and return to read the advanced topics , but I still hold the view that reading kernel books is very helpful to understand the internals of linux. Is it somewhat right?

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    Quote Originally Posted by L4Linux View Post
    Instead of reading a book about the kernel, I would suggest to start using a more "hardcore" distro (am I using the term correctly...? please correct me), such as Slackware or Gentoo. And after you feel comfortable with them (I guess it will take you some time),try Linux From Scratch.
    Well, I have downloaded the virtualbox and the gentoo now . Maybe after some time for my exams I'll study them and be used to them .. Thank you all.

    ---
    leafan

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