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Hi All, Could you please clarify my doubts related to softirqs and tasklets. While googling I observerd below points about softirqs and tasklets. Softirqs: Softirqs have storng CPU affinity. A ...
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    Bottom halves


    Hi All,

    Could you please clarify my doubts related to softirqs and tasklets. While googling I observerd below points about softirqs and tasklets.

    Softirqs: Softirqs have storng CPU affinity. A softirq handler will execute on the same CPU that it is raised on.
    Tasklets: Unlike softirqs, a tasklet may run on only one CPU at a time. Tasklets have a weaker CPU affinity than softirqs. If the tasklet has already been scheduled on a different CPU, it will not moved to another CPU if it is still pending.

    From the above, softirqs are having storng CPU affinity and tasklets are having weak CPU affinity, but both softirq and tasklet will execute on the same CPU.

    Could you please tell me what is the meaning of the below sentence.

    "A tasklet always runs on the same CPU that schedules it."

    Thanks in advance.

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    Quote Originally Posted by kumar1 View Post
    Hi All,

    Could you please clarify my doubts related to softirqs and tasklets. While googling I observerd below points about softirqs and tasklets.

    Softirqs: Softirqs have storng CPU affinity. A softirq handler will execute on the same CPU that it is raised on.
    Tasklets: Unlike softirqs, a tasklet may run on only one CPU at a time. Tasklets have a weaker CPU affinity than softirqs. If the tasklet has already been scheduled on a different CPU, it will not moved to another CPU if it is still pending.

    From the above, softirqs are having storng CPU affinity and tasklets are having weak CPU affinity, but both softirq and tasklet will execute on the same CPU.

    Could you please tell me what is the meaning of the below sentence.

    "A tasklet always runs on the same CPU that schedules it."

    Thanks in advance.
    From "Linux Device Drivers, 2nd Edition", chapter 9:
    Tasklets and Bottom-Half Processing

    One of the main problems with interrupt handling is how to perform longish tasks within a handler. Often a substantial amount of work must be done in response to a device interrupt, but interrupt handlers need to finish up quickly and not keep interrupts blocked for long. These two needs (work and speed) conflict with each other, leaving the driver writer in a bit of a bind.

    Linux (along with many other systems) resolves this problem by splitting the interrupt handler into two halves. The so-called top half is the routine that actually responds to the interrupt -- the one you register with request_irq. The bottom half is a routine that is scheduled by the top half to be executed later, at a safer time. The use of the term bottom half in the 2.4 kernel can be a bit confusing, in that it can mean either the second half of an interrupt handler or one of the mechanisms used to implement this second half, or both. When we refer to a bottom half we are speaking generally about a bottom half; the old Linux bottom-half implementation is referred to explicitly with the acronym BH.

    But what is a bottom half useful for?

    The big difference between the top-half handler and the bottom half is that all interrupts are enabled during execution of the bottom half -- that's why it runs at a safer time. In the typical scenario, the top half saves device data to a device-specific buffer, schedules its bottom half, and exits: this is very fast. The bottom half then performs whatever other work is required, such as awakening processes, starting up another I/O operation, and so on. This setup permits the top half to service a new interrupt while the bottom half is still working.

    Every serious interrupt handler is split this way. For instance, when a network interface reports the arrival of a new packet, the handler just retrieves the data and pushes it up to the protocol layer; actual processing of the packet is performed in a bottom half.

    One thing to keep in mind with bottom-half processing is that all of the restrictions that apply to interrupt handlers also apply to bottom halves. Thus, bottom halves cannot sleep, cannot access user space, and cannot invoke the scheduler.

    The Linux kernel has two different mechanisms that may be used to implement bottom-half processing. Tasklets were introduced late in the 2.3 development series; they are now the preferred way to do bottom-half processing, but they are not portable to earlier kernel versions. The older bottom-half (BH) implementation exists in even very old kernels, though it is implemented with tasklets in 2.4. We'll look at both mechanisms here. In general, device drivers writing new code should choose tasklets for their bottom-half processing if possible, though portability considerations may determine that the BH mechanism needs to be used instead.

    The following discussion works, once again, with the short driver. When loaded with a module option, short can be told to do interrupt processing in a top/bottom-half mode, with either a tasklet or bottom-half handler. In this case, the top half executes quickly; it simply remembers the current time and schedules the bottom half processing. The bottom half is then charged with encoding this time and awakening any user processes that may be waiting for data.
    Since these "tasklets" are generally part of an interrupt handler, they cannot migrate to another CPU other than where they were scheduled by the "top half" of the handler.
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

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