Find the answer to your Linux question:
Results 1 to 4 of 4
Hi, A few years ago, I have modified the linux kernel 2.4 to add a driver for an UART. I 've modified serial.c. Now, I have the linux kernel 2.6 ...
Enjoy an ad free experience by logging in. Not a member yet? Register.
  1. #1
    Just Joined!
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    2

    Serial driver (kernel 2.4 -> kernel 2.6)


    Hi,

    A few years ago, I have modified the linux kernel 2.4 to add a driver for an UART. I 've modified serial.c.
    Now, I have the linux kernel 2.6 and I want add my driver. I can't find the serial.c. Is it replaced by 8250.c ?

    Thank's

    Sioloki

  2. #2
    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    I can be found either 40 miles west of Chicago, in Chicago, or in a galaxy far, far away.
    Posts
    11,655
    The kernel-driver interfaces on 2.6 are considerably different from 2.4. I don't know if the 8250.c code replaces the serial.c code or not. If so, it will still differ considerably. In any case, 2.6 supports a LOT more hardware than 2.4 did. You might just try configuring and building the new kernel as-is and see if your gear is handled properly.
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

  3. #3
    Just Joined!
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    2
    My UART was already supported by Linux 2.4 but there is a bug on the serial board, so I must adjust the serial driver to correct it.

  4. $spacer_open
    $spacer_close
  5. #4
    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    I can be found either 40 miles west of Chicago, in Chicago, or in a galaxy far, far away.
    Posts
    11,655
    Well, then it should still be supported on the 2.6 and later kernels. You can get the source for the kernel you will be using, and then modify that. Bear in mind that there will be some differences in the low-level kernel code between the 2.4 and 2.6 and later versions which will require careful consideration as you modify the kernel code.
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •