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Hi, all: I just successfully built kernel 3.4.2 and would like to play around with it. However, just right after I reboot Ubuntu 12.04 with the new kernel, GUIs become ...
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  1. #1
    Just Joined!
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    Surrey, BC, Canada
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    Successfully build kernel 3.4.2, but now, Ubuntu 12.04 GUI is extremel


    Hi, all:

    I just successfully built kernel 3.4.2 and would like to play around with it. However, just right after I reboot Ubuntu 12.04 with the new kernel, GUIs become extremely slow. Even moving a prompt shell or a text editor window is unbearably slow.

    Then, I doublechecked AMD Catalyst Control Centre (I'm using a AMD Radeon 8600 series video card). I happened to notice the Display Properties under Display Manager (
    AMDCatalyst Control Centre->Display Manager->Display Properties
    ) always pick up a resolution: Preferred (4000X4000), and Refresh Rate is always: Preferred (160Hz). And, unfortunately, I'm not able to change it.

    Since what I built from the kernel are only 2 files:
    initrd.img-3.4.2 and vmlinuz-3.4.2
    I'm wondering if I need more files to configure the whole system?
    Since I notice for my older kernels, there are at least
    abi, config and System.map files under /boot

    peij-Ubuntu:/boot$ ls
    abi-3.2.0-25-generic memtest86+.bin
    abi-3.2.0-25-generic-pae memtest86+_multiboot.bin
    config-3.2.0-25-generic System.map-3.2.0-25-generic
    config-3.2.0-25-generic-pae System.map-3.2.0-25-generic-pae
    grub vmlinuz-3.2.0-25-generic
    initrd.img-3.2.0-25-generic vmlinuz-3.2.0-25-generic-pae
    initrd.img-3.2.0-25-generic-pae vmlinuz-3.4.2
    initrd.img-3.4.2

    Can anybody give me a hand?


    Cheers
    Pei

  2. #2
    Trusted Penguin
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    4,353
    When you built the new kernel, did you use the .config file from your current kernel? That is usually the best way to do it, as the .config contains a lot of the kernel selections tuned for your hardware. You can get the .config from /boot or sometimes it is compress in /proc/config.gz. You'd put it in your kernel build directory, then run:
    Code:
    make O=/path/to/build/dir oldconfig
    it will take all the old settings and apply them to the new kernel. there will of course be new kernel options that your old .config does not know about, and so you will be asked about each of these options (usually a Y/N question).

    then you'd proceed w/make;make modules_install;make install, etc.

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