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Hi everyone! Here's an odd thing: a few days ago I did the online updates for SuSE 10, and since then I haven't been able to use anything (games ) ...
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  1. #1
    Just Joined! Dpontes11's Avatar
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    Question Unistalling kernel


    Hi everyone!

    Here's an odd thing: a few days ago I did the online updates for SuSE 10, and since then I haven't been able to use anything (games ) that uses the 3D accelarator.

    I have re-installed the drivers for my graphics board, but no dice...

    I've put this problem on another thread, and at the end I kind of understood that a solution was to uninstall through YaST the latest kernel source that I have and reinstall the previous version, that's available on the computer.

    Thing is, I don't know how to do this, or if it's even possible or safe...

    Any help here?

    Thanks in advance...

  2. #2
    Linux Guru sdousley's Avatar
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    When u say install the previous version, what u will need to do is to install the perken-source package that relates to the running kernel you have. Now, since SuSE has a pre-compiled kernel for you anyway, i would have thought this would be done any. You could check though. Check the version of the kernel-source package in YaST, and then use the

    uname -r

    command to see what version you are running.
    "I am not an alcoholic, alcoholics go to meetings"
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  3. #3
    Just Joined! Dpontes11's Avatar
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    Through uname -r, I saw the version: 2.6.13-15.8, as I've already seen in YaST.

    In YaST, I'm presented with the information that this is the version installed, but that the previous one is available. What I needed to know is how to go back to this one, without risking the normal use of this computer.

    I wanted to go back to that previous version because it seems that the drivers for my ATI graphics board only work with that kernel version.

    i'm very young to Linux, and I must say that I have no idea what a perken-source code is...

    Sorry about this, maybe you can shine some light to me about it!

    Bye

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  5. #4
    Linux Guru sdousley's Avatar
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    Downgrading the kernel-source package wont affect the system really. All it means is that anything u try it install that requires them wont work properly, unless you fully downgrade the kernel. Personally i have never managed to successfully do this on SuSE.

    Though since then, i have found that in /boot there is a config-<version> file. What you would need to do is to use that to create a new kernel of thelower version.
    "I am not an alcoholic, alcoholics go to meetings"
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  6. #5
    Just Joined! Dpontes11's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sdousley
    Though since then, i have found that in /boot there is a config-<version> file. What you would need to do is to use that to create a new kernel of the lower version.
    OK, I've found that file, but it's referent to the latest kernel, not the previous one. How do I create a new kernel of the lower version?

  7. #6
    Linux Guru sdousley's Avatar
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    In order to make a older kernel, u will need to download the relevent kernel-source package. This will create a folder in /usr/src and also a symlink within that folder called "linux"

    in order to make the kernel u will need to copy that config file to /usr/src/linux (make sure that that symlink points to the version that you are wanting to install) and then do:
    Code:
    cp /boot/config-<version> /usr/src/linux/.config
    NOTE: the "dot" AFTER the final "/" and BEFORE the word config. This is the config file that the kernel make process will read all the options from. Once you have done this, you can use:
    Code:
    make && make modules_install
    in order to actually make the kernel itself. Then it's a simple case of
    Code:
    cp arch/i386/boot/bzImage /boot/linux-new
    and then reconfigure grub (config file at /boot/grub/menu.lst) the best way to do this is simply to copy the existing entry to boot SuSE, and recreate it changing the name of the kernel image, this way, instead of completely breaking your system (overwriting a functional kernel with a nin-functional one) You can always boot the old kernel should the new one not work properly
    "I am not an alcoholic, alcoholics go to meetings"
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