Find the answer to your Linux question:
Results 1 to 5 of 5
Dear All, Currently I am studying about Kernel Space drivers and there i have came across the term Kernel Ring Buffer, 'dmesg' command either control or print the Kernel Ring ...
Enjoy an ad free experience by logging in. Not a member yet? Register.
  1. #1
    Just Joined!
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    74

    What Kernel Ring Buffer Contains?


    Dear All,
    Currently I am studying about Kernel Space drivers and there i have came across the term Kernel Ring Buffer, 'dmesg' command either control or print the Kernel Ring Buffer, so i want to know that what exactly the Kernel Ring Buffer contains? what are the contents inside the Kernel Ring Buffer?

    Thanks,
    Nishant

  2. #2
    Linux User fernape's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Holland
    Posts
    301
    Quote Originally Posted by Nishant Desai
    what are the contents inside the Kernel Ring Buffer?
    AFAIK It is a log buffer. It contains messages from the kernel, from modules, etc.

    Best Regards

  3. #3
    Just Joined!
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    74
    Quote Originally Posted by fernape
    AFAIK It is a log buffer. It contains messages from the kernel, from modules, etc.

    Best Regards
    Dear fernape,
    Thanks for the info dude, i want to know that this messaes are of which type? are they about the devices or notifications or modules of the kernel?, basically which kind of messages are they?

    Thanks,
    Nishant

  4. #4
    Linux User fernape's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Holland
    Posts
    301
    Basically they are debuggin messages. For example when a new filesystem is registered in the kernel due to a module loading. Sometimes it provides non-severe errors messages like an Oops. That kind of things.

    Also if you write a kernel module and use the printk function your message will be displayed with dmesg.

    Best Regards

  5. #5
    Just Joined!
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    74
    Quote Originally Posted by fernape
    Basically they are debuggin messages. For example when a new filesystem is registered in the kernel due to a module loading. Sometimes it provides non-severe errors messages like an Oops. That kind of things.

    Also if you write a kernel module and use the printk function your message will be displayed with dmesg.

    Best Regards
    Hey Dude,

    Thanks for the info man, that is what i was looking for that which kind of messages this command generates...

    Thanks,
    Nishant

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •