Find the answer to your Linux question:
Results 1 to 4 of 4
Well this is to the Linux Kernal programmers, also the kernal programming for the power of the processer distribution, what am i saying is, programming the Linux kernal instructions, to ...
Enjoy an ad free experience by logging in. Not a member yet? Register.
  1. #1
    Just Joined!
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    1

    programming the kernal to make use of dual core for the whole os


    Well this is to the Linux Kernal programmers, also the kernal programming for the power of the processer distribution,

    what am i saying is, programming the Linux kernal instructions, to make use of dual core and distribution that power to be like a 1 core processing being like a 6ghz processer,

    well its my idea, i am no programmer but, dual core programming for whatever program, hell the operateing system is a program, so put dual core programming and tweak it and so, so you would use a bit of both cores at the same time ,

    well,makeing use of 2 cores is not impossible , but these old programs are programmed to make use of 1 core, so if the kernal is programmed to make use of 2 cores at the same time and translate that to be like one core, so these older programs will be able to understand,and prehaps i don't think they are programmed for a 6ghz or 8 ghz core.

    my idea.

    if you think this idea is dumb or impossible, then why was dual core allowed for the go ahead into mass production,

  2. #2
    Linux User fernape's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Holland
    Posts
    301
    Quote Originally Posted by holylucifer
    well its my idea, i am no programmer but, dual core programming for whatever program, hell the operateing system is a program, so put dual core programming and tweak it and so, so you would use a bit of both cores at the same time ,
    In fact the linux kernel does this yet. It uses multiple cores as it was a SMP system. Some parts of the kernel can be executed in one core and other parts in other core. A user process can be executed in one core while kernel code is being executed in the other core....

    About apps. AFAIK, a multi-threaded application can schedule its threads to different cores simultaneously (well, the kernel does this.)

    Best Regards

  3. #3
    Linux Guru
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    6,110
    Mutliple Cores/CPUs or threading improves performance. Having a 6GHz processor with only one thread might be fast at one thing - but it would have to queue all of it's processes. I would imagine that using the multiple cores seperately would produce much shorter processing times.

  4. #4
    Just Joined!
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Cincinnati, OH, USA
    Posts
    6
    First, the spelling is kernel not kernal

    Don't count on the kernel alone to schedule both cores. It can only do so much. Scheduling for one core or the other based on current processor usage is certainly viable and works well for allowing background tasks to run on one core with foreground applications running on the other core.

    However, most of what people want out of dual core/dual proc cpus is better performance all around. And this has to come at a higher level than the kernel. You can't simply "enable" dual core usage and expect 2x performance on your app. You have to have your app programmed to specifically execute certain instructions on each core. For instance, running all the physics and integer math for games on one core while running the user space and interactive processes on the other. Essentially - it has to be a multi-process application with each process optimized for running on separate cores. It takes very careful programming to accomplish the task.


    I'm just trying to divert your attention from what you think is the kernel's responsibility. It is more largely a role of the application programmers to tune their apps for dual procs.

    It may sound silly, but watch the development for the Sony Cell processor for the PS3 - it is banking heavily on the promise of developers to really begin to separate out threads for each cell of the chip. Without it, you'll have a simple old Pentium processor or worse. With threading optimizations however you can get amazing performance, because each piece of silicon is optimized for certain instructions.


    One last thing - saying that a dual core chip running at 3 GHz should see the performance of a single core 6 GHz chip -- the logic is flawed, in both directions. Scaling a single core from 3 to 6 GHz does not scale performance linearly. Likewise, dual core 3 GHz chips are not designed to double the performance of a single core 3 GHz chip. Marketing would love for consumers to believe that, but it's simply not true.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •