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Hi, I have always been a Mac user, and currently have an iMac running OS X 10.5.2 I have very limited coding experience - c-basic & html. I have NEVER ...
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  1. #1
    Just Joined! VicMar's Avatar
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    New to Linux - Idiot needs help!


    Hi,
    I have always been a Mac user, and currently have an iMac running OS X 10.5.2

    I have very limited coding experience - c-basic & html.
    I have NEVER run Linux, and don't think I have even seen it run anywhere, so I am completely clueless about it.

    I have downloaded a version - Knoppix? and have read how to use this to boot up my Mac.

    I understand that will mean Linux is my operating system, but will Linux then run things e.g my web browsers etc., or will I have to set up web browsers separately?

    The main reason I ask is because I intend to follow a tutorial from the web, but realise that if I donít have a web browser, I would have to print off the instructions, so that I could follow the ĎLog outí procedure.

    Sorry if this sounds a bit stupid, but I have no ink in my printer at the moment, but want to try Linux at the soonest opportunity.

    Thanks in advance,

    Vic

  2. #2
    Linux Enthusiast Manchunian's Avatar
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    Hello, and welcome to Linux! Nice to find a Mac user amongst us!

    I understand that will mean Linux is my operating system, but will Linux then run things e.g my web browsers etc., or will I have to set up web browsers separately?
    Yes, you'll be able to browse straight away (although sometimes you may need to set up the Internet connection, but most distros will do this themselves these days). Almost all versions of Linux will have everything you need already pre-installed. However, you'll almost certainly need to install Flash and Java yourself, a task which can be a bit arduous, but is getting easier all the time. However, something that Windows users often find surprising, Linux comes with almost everything, from Web browsers, Office applications to games...and all free!

    Sorry if this sounds a bit stupid
    Doesn't sound stupid at all! Heading off into the unknown is always a bit daunting!
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  3. #3
    Just Joined! VicMar's Avatar
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    Thanks Manchunian.

    As you say, stepping into the unknown is a bit daunting.

    I think I will probably wait until there is nobody but me at home (tomorrow morning), so that I can use my 'special words' if I muck things up.

    I already have Flash and Java in Mac OSX. Will I need to set up different versions for Linux?

  4. #4
    Linux Guru techieMoe's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by VicMar View Post
    Thanks Manchunian.

    As you say, stepping into the unknown is a bit daunting.

    I think I will probably wait until there is nobody but me at home (tomorrow morning), so that I can use my 'special words' if I muck things up.

    I already have Flash and Java in Mac OSX. Will I need to set up different versions for Linux?
    Yes. There are Linux versions of Flash and Java. I think you'll find that the version of Java for Linux is a bit more up-to-date than the one that comes with OS X. (Or not... I just notice things like that since Java is my job.)
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  5. #5
    Linux Enthusiast Manchunian's Avatar
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    Yeah, waiting for calm is definetely a good plan! Not that you'll get hot and bothered, but you do need to concentrate!

    I already have Flash and Java in Mac OSX. Will I need to set up different versions for Linux?
    Yes you will. I've never installed Linux on a Mac, but you'll have to create two separate partitions (what file system does Mac use?) and, besides, Mac programmes won't work in Linux, unless you use an emulator of course. The procedure of installing Java can be made easier by using scripts, but these are best avoided as they can in the long run break the system. Best do it by hand, which involves creating symbolic links from the Java package to your webrowser. It's actually not terrribly complicated, but to a newbie it's a bit of a headache. Flash is much easier, though.
    PS - what Linux distro do you intend installing? Don't be tempted to install Knoppix, even if you like it, it's not meant to run from hard disk. Maybe you should try something like Ubuntu or Mint, which are 'easier' options for newbies.
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  6. #6
    Just Joined! VicMar's Avatar
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    Yes. There are Linux versions of Flash and Java.
    Thanks for that techiemoe.

    Manchunian,
    but you'll have to create two separate partitions (what file system does Mac use?)
    Now you're starting to get me worrying again. Doh!
    The procedure of installing Java can be made easier by using scripts, but these are best avoided as they can in the long run break the system. Best do it by hand, which involves creating symbolic links from the Java package to your webrowser.
    :drown:WHAT!!!???
    Flash is much easier, though.
    Says you - Double Doh!
    PS - what Linux distro do you intend installing?
    I intended to run it from a disc, rather than install it.

    Have you guys worked out that when I said 'Idiot needs help', I meant 'real cowardly Idiot' too?

  7. #7
    Linux Guru Jonathan183's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by VicMar View Post
    I have downloaded a version - Knoppix? and have read how to use this to boot up my Mac.
    Knoppix is normally a live CD - you boot from it when you want to, but don't normally install it on the hard drive. If a distro is supposed to be a live CD then it is usually best to run it that way only ... at least until you are sufficiently familar with Linux to know how to do so.

    Run it from the live CD ... that way nothing is installed to the hard drive unless you elect to do that.

    Ed: seen your above post after I had posted -you are intending running as a live CD anyway

  8. #8
    Linux Enthusiast Manchunian's Avatar
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    Now you're starting to get me worrying again.
    Well, if you're not intending to actually install Linux there's no need to! Partitioning means dividing your disk into bits that are readable by one operating system, but may not be for another. For example, Linux can read and write into a Windows partition, but Windows cannot see Linux at all as it doesn't recognise the way in which Linux stores data. But, as I said, this only matters if you actually want to commit to a hard disk install.

    WHAT!!!???
    If you don't understand what I wrote back there, don't worry about it! Again, it has no importance to you if you're not installing because...

    I intended to run it from a disc, rather than install it.
    And there we go. That spoils everything! You can install diddley sugar on a live disk because it's readable only!

    Says you - Double Doh!
    Just take my word for it!
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  9. #9
    Linux Guru techieMoe's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Manchunian View Post
    Yes you will. I've never installed Linux on a Mac, but you'll have to create two separate partitions (what file system does Mac use?)
    Macs use the Heirarchal File System + (or HFS+ for short). You can resize it using either Boot Camp or one of the command-line utilities that comes with it. I would recommend following a tutorial for that. Most say for the MacBook Pro, but as long as your iMac is an Intel-based one it should work the same.

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  10. #10
    Just Joined! VicMar's Avatar
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    Thanks

    Thanks you Guys.

    Todays schedule has been put on hold because of a medical emergency with one of our dogs, so I probably won't be trying Linux today.

    If anyone has any other tips for getting me started, please send them in.

    Thanks again.

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