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... because it seems to very new-user friendly, and includes a lot of software and things that otherwise i would have difficulty installing myself. I'm going to install it using ...
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  1. #1
    Just Joined!
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    57

    Right, ive finally chosen Knoppix as my Distro.....


    ... because it seems to very new-user friendly, and includes a lot of software and things that otherwise i would have difficulty installing myself.

    I'm going to install it using the Knoppix option (which gives you the same content as the live dvd itself)

    what i want to know is, can i upgrade knoppix?

    for instance, can i install new versions of ATI drivers?
    Can i download new kernel updates for Knoppix as they become available?

    Etc.Etc.

    If i cant, and im basically getting a fixed, completely unchangeable disk-image which just happens to be on a hardrive, then i will have to re-evaluate.

  2. #2
    Linux User
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    357
    Yes you can update Knoppix once installed to the hard drive.

    It;s a distro based on Debian so it uses apt-get for software installs and updates.

    Remember google is your friend. A quick search gave up this info.

    http://www.bytebot.net/geekdocs/debian-knoppix.html

    Take a look at step 10

    10. You now have a fully installed, English GNU/Linux desktop system, with Mozilla, OpenOffice.org, KDE, and many other interesting utilities.

    If this is your first Debian system, go to the website and read some documents. Google as always is your best friend, and your LUGs will be willing to help you. But let's get started on a few important things first:

    * apt-get update will get the list of the latest available packages for you that are available (assuming you have an Internet connection) in your sources list.
    * You may want to edit the /etc/apt/sources.list file and implement some local sources, instead of one's in Germany (notice the ".de" stuff?). If you're within Australia, Stewart Smith has provided a list of useful sources (for the unstable branch):

    deb http://mirror.aarnet.edu.au/pub/debian/ unstable main non-free contrib
    deb-src http://mirror.aarnet.edu.au/pub/debian/ unstable main non-free contrib
    deb http://ftp.au.debian.org/pub/debian/ unstable main non-free contrib
    deb-src http://ftp.au.debian.org/pub/debian/ unstable main non-free contrib

    If you're within America, Rick Moen's sources.list for the testing/unstable branch will be of more help.
    * Installing packages are easy as! Just do an apt-cache search <packagename> and then once you've found what you want, perform a apt-get install <packagename>.
    * If you got your hands on the 7 Debian 3.0 CDs (Woody), you can apt-cdrom add each and every one of them into your sources.list file. This would save you downloads from the Internet, unless a package has been updated.

  3. #3
    Just Joined!
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    57
    Thanks Logan5.

    One thing im unsure of, it says to change the sources.list file.

    Im in the UK, so what would i change it to? given that those instructions are for 3.2 and for usa and australia.

    Also, what does testing/unstable mean?

    Is there a stable list that i can use? I dont really want to download things that are going to crash all the time or something.

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