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Originally Posted by penguin2 Do you think a laptop buyer should chose a laptop with a Nvidia card? I am sure this question still gets asked a lot but with ...
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  1. #11
    Just Joined! Djarum's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by penguin2 View Post
    Do you think a laptop buyer should chose a laptop with a Nvidia card?

    I am sure this question still gets asked a lot but with so many laptops being equipped with a recent ATI card nowadays, it makes sense to ask about ATI support when it comes to Linux.
    I absolutely insist on my laptop having NV graphics, and this is why. ATI is notorious for suddenly and prematurely cutting driver support for one product line when it comes to Linux., while NV driver support tends to last much longer. This is my opinion based on my experience with both brands and there may be documented evidence to the contrary.

    The reason why I say go with NV is simple. You can't change your laptops GPU when ATI suddenly says, "Sorry, we've decided it's not cost effective to maintain support for that card, even though you just bough it." So it's best to just buy a laptop with a GPU brand that offers the most support longevity. While Open source drivers are improving, you are still better off with proprietary drivers at this point.

    Case and point. I owned an ATI X1950GT made by Sapphire. The card worked beautifully and I had no complaints. When Ubuntu 9.04 was released, the included version of X.org broke the ATI proprietary driver. "No problem," I thought, "I'll just go get the new driver." Low and behold and as a suspicious coincidence, the very same day that version of X.org was released, ATI decided it was time to retire support for that card and I was left with only open source drivers. I had only owned that card for about 15-18 months or so and was very upset that I didn't get more longevity from ATI's support department. Needless to say my loyalties lie with nVidia from now on.

  2. #12
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    I had a similar experience with ATI. My first HTPC was using Windows Media Center 2005. In order to get it to display HDTV, I had to buy an ATI X850 card, for $400.

    I recently decided that I would try to convert it to MythTV box. I know that ATI has been working on the Linux driver, so I decided to give them a try. Much to my surprise, support for my card has just been removed, as Djarim has already said. A $400 card is worthless unless you use Windows. This is unacceptable!

    I also have a $1200 CAD program that needs Windows. Otherwise I would smash the ATI card with a hammer, and install a nVidia card and Linux.

    I will NEVER purchase another product that relies on an ATI video chip. Even if it is currently supported by the Linux driver. nVidia has supported the Linux community by providing a very very good driver and product. They deserve our support, as they have earned it. I recently purchased a mITX board with a nVidia ION graphics chip. It easily displays HDTV graphics, and I use it as a MythTV HTPC.

    There is a new 12" Asus that has the ION and the Intel Atom dual core N330 CPU. It isn't good enough for gaming, though.

    Newegg.com - ASUS Eee PC 1201N-PU17-BK Black Intel Atom N330(1.60GHz) 12.1" WXGA 2GB Memory 250GB HDD NetBook - Netbooks
    Last edited by waterhead; 12-27-2009 at 01:03 AM.
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  3. #13
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    Ubuntu on M400

    My last laptop was a Toshiba M400, and Ubuntu ran great. The only real problem was connecting an external monitor was not consistent. The tablet screen worked, power management, etc. I was really pleased. I had run windows XP on it for a time, and I was amazed at how quick things were when I went back to Linux.

    I "upgraded" recently to an HP tx2, and I've been less happy with the way the computer is put together, but I don't know how it would perform under windows (it's a work computer, and I decided that I really needed powerpoint and a few other things to be compatible with the office - so I get my linux fix in a virtual box, at least until I get really fed up with windows again).

  4. #14
    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sqcomic View Post
    My last laptop was a Toshiba M400, and Ubuntu ran great. The only real problem was connecting an external monitor was not consistent. The tablet screen worked, power management, etc. I was really pleased. I had run windows XP on it for a time, and I was amazed at how quick things were when I went back to Linux.

    I "upgraded" recently to an HP tx2, and I've been less happy with the way the computer is put together, but I don't know how it would perform under windows (it's a work computer, and I decided that I really needed powerpoint and a few other things to be compatible with the office - so I get my linux fix in a virtual box, at least until I get really fed up with windows again).
    Personally, if it would run Ubuntu directly, I'd run Windows in a virtual box instead of the other way around. At least that way it is easy to snapshot your Windows image from time to time, so when you get the inevitable Windows virus, you can just roll back to the previous snapshot... Bingo! No more virus!
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

  5. #15
    Linux Engineer nujinini's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by waterhead View Post
    My personal opinion: I will never purchase another computer that relies on Intel graphics!

    Intel graphics are OK if you only surf the web or only play low-res SD videos. Don't ever expect it to play HD video. On anything that needs GPU hardware acceleration, Intel video chokes.

    ANY nVidia graphics chip is better than the best Intel video chip.
    I agree, my lenovo G430 has an intel and I can see the difference when I use other machines with nvidia graphics. I also had encountered brightness control issues on kernels 2.30.xx.x and above.
    nujinini
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  6. #16
    Linux Engineer nujinini's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rubberman View Post
    Personally, if it would run Ubuntu directly, I'd run Windows in a virtual box instead of the other way around. At least that way it is easy to snapshot your Windows image from time to time, so when you get the inevitable Windows virus, you can just roll back to the previous snapshot... Bingo! No more virus!
    Yes, getting viruses or corrupting your system is an inevitable thing in windows, I must agree.

    But then again, one can always go through the pain of making a fresh reinstall and update of your windows should it fail. Or upgrade to the next release which is just sold for a few dollars. And by the way, make sure you buy a good antivirus.
    nujinini
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