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To make a long story short picked up a netbook (eee pc 1005pe) to have something to write on because no one produces actual, old school word processors anymore. Got ...
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  1. #1
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    Need help with an EEE PC (resolved)


    To make a long story short picked up a netbook (eee pc 1005pe) to have something to write on because no one produces actual, old school word processors anymore. Got sick of Windows 7 and decided to install Linux because it'll do everything I need it to do and well, these things don't have a lot of horsepower. But, I did a boneheaded thing and am now trying not to beat my head against a wall.

    To start with the machine was duel boot it had an ap called Express Gate and Win 7. Noticed there were two hidden partitions on the HD as well. No cd on these things so I guessed one was an archive to use as a backup/repair and, the second I found out was for the boot-loader.

    Now what I stupidly did, I repartitioned the whole thing and now just get a black screen with a little flashing prompt. And when I try to install any flavor of any os, it hangs up when the boot-loader is installing or, gives me an error message saying the boot-loader won't install.

    I checked around and found out I could just use an sd card to boot up but, I'd rather just find out how to fix it the right way. Anyone have any ideas?

    Thanks for reading.
    Last edited by Seamus6387; 04-11-2011 at 05:41 AM. Reason: Fixed the problem I needed info on

  2. #2
    Linux Enthusiast sgosnell's Avatar
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    I would get a Linux Mint Debian Edition .iso, or a regular Linux Mint .iso, burn it to a flash drive, and repartition the drive and then install the Linux distro. You may not have a valid partition on the drive now. You can also install the OS to an SD card, and it's probably a good idea to have it even if you get the HDD working. It's a good, quick way to boot if you have problems, and it doesn't hang out the side and get hit.

  3. #3
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    Thanks and an Update

    Got it working, good idea to put an OS the sd card too btw. Will have to do that as a backup.

    Sadly enough, started searching around for info on how to fix the problem and noticed that Ubuntu seemed to be the distro everyone was loading onto these machines so, thought I'd try it. And for some reason it installed and loaded right up (I was going to do with Debian originally).

    Have no idea why it worked but, I will find out. Sad, two days of working, 4 different distro's and, as always it's the last thing you try...

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  5. #4
    Linux Enthusiast sgosnell's Avatar
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    I tried out almost all the major distros using my SD card before I decided on one. It's cheap and easy enough. Linux Mint is a derivative of Ubuntu, and has codecs that make it work on just about everything. It seems to be easier to use than standard Ubuntu. I ran Ubuntu for a long time, but I got tired of the breakage on every upgrade, because of the strict 6-month release schedule. Ubuntu releases a new version every April and October, whether it's ready or not. Debian releases when it's ready, and using Sid, it's a rolling release, meaning I just do regular updates and never have to reinstall. In the end, the choice of a Linux distro is a very subjective thing, and everyone is free to use the one they like best, and meets their needs best. And free is the operative word here - they're all free.

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