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I only had the 5.25 inch floppies (and still do) but last week I found out that my 5.25 inch floppy drive had finally bought the farm. I have 8K ...
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  1. #11
    Linux Enthusiast
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Saint Paul, MN
    Posts
    649

    I only had the 5.25 inch floppies (and still do) but last week I found out that my 5.25 inch floppy drive had finally bought the farm.

    I have 8K of core memory for sale, you will need to supply the circuitry to read and write to the memory as that was recycled about 23 years ago (when my wife forced me to recycle the TTY that I had and the bit-480 computer (saved the core memory as it fit into another box).

    I do have an 1990s man pages in a single paper back book, which has sections and not volumes.

    I still have two Sun SpacStation 5 computers (seems so much slower than back in the day).

  2. #12
    Just Joined!
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Posts
    8
    An update:

    I have pretty much finished the setup of my Linux laptop. None too soon either, as my SCO Unix computer had another outage of its network card, and I didn't try to revive it this time. I'm completely off the SCO Unix (and Xenix) I've used for over 25 years and on Ubuntu Linux on a $350 laptop.

    I have character screens, VIA a graphics desktop and VIA the character screen drivers of the Linux OS itself (which I use the most and the reason for my initial post). I have a graphics desktop too, on the same machine at the same time, where before I've gone to a 2nd computer (WIN).

    And to top all of that off, I downloaded "vinagre" remote desktop and set up my only other computer, a MS Win XP computer, to let my Linux box connect to it via Remote Desktop. So now I have its monitor turned off and its keyboard set aside, and just operate it VIA a remote desktop session from my Ubuntu laptop, all with while running other desktop apps, and text screens/jobs at the same time.

    I'm loving it!

    The only thing I'd like to improve upon is my initial question. And that is for the text/character screens, I was concerned that it (Linux) would only use a portion of the screen -- that there would be area to the right, and maybe even the bottom, of the screen that is unused. And that is the case, though the font is very large like I want. The only problem is that when I'm using a text editor, like "ed" or "vi", it is hard to tell where the right margin is because all of the screen has the same background color, not just the usable portion.

    I'm hoping I can change this, but I'm way too happy with the rest of the system for this to be a stopper.

  3. #13
    Linux Enthusiast
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Saint Paul, MN
    Posts
    649
    I sounds like you are leaving a BORG for an even larger BORG.

    Welcome.

    I tend to run Gentoo on my systems (laptops also), but I have virtual machines with Fedora, Mint, CentOs, debian, and a 10.X Ubuntu. At times I get a Linux teaching job and I will have an eternal drive with what-ever the class needs for the students (the last time was 2.5 years ago). A can not teach Windows and most places will prefer both but it is okay with then if good and windows and not very good with Linux if they have a course defined). I am not up on specifics for Ubuntu but good at general stuff.


    You should look at installing "gvim" (I turn off the tool bar as I do not use it). It comes with "gview" and "gvimdiff" and opens a window for vim (all the vim commands work and the mouse works for cutting and pasting). Both "vimdiff" and "gvimdiff" shows lines that are different in a highlighted color and the specific differences in another color (based in colorscheme). By default they use "folding" but that can be turned off. Then the two text files are compared side-by-side and it points your eyes to the differences (or that differences need to scroll left or right to see the differences on the line). I gvim it is possible to scroll the side that your cursor is in independently from the other side. The scrolling of the side that has the cursor will scroll both sides. As I aged I switched to hi-light the matching (, [, etc. I have been known to turn on search hi-lighting (which is now always on so I no longer need to turn it on) to check for a typo in variable/function names because they are not hi-lighted.

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