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  1. #1

    grep VGA and Forced Resolution Setting


    Hi,

    I'd like to know how to find out the VGA output assignment for my laptop screen. Have tried xrandr | grep VGA and it says VGA1 disconnected. VGA0 and VGA2 are not of use either.

    It's a Dell D520 laptop 4:3 resolution. Can anyone tell me how to force resolution settings to 1400x1050? The maximum setting in the System>Preferences>Hardware>Displays is 1024x768.

    Any help will be appreciated.


    Thanks!!!!

    Carlos L.

  2. #2

  3. #3
    The max res is 1024 x 768 so that's all it will do,,,
    Are you a clueless Kali user? If you can't get Kali running on your own, it ain't the right distro for you.

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  5. #4
    Linux Guru Segfault's Avatar
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    It may be the max resolution available with driver currently in use. Can happen if VGA fallback driver is used instead of proper driver. This is why our poster was expected to post the pastebin link to the Xorg log. Looking at the log we can tell exactly what is going on.

  6. #5
    I looked up the specific laptop and the hardware max is 1024x768 it uses the old Intel 945 graphics...
    Are you a clueless Kali user? If you can't get Kali running on your own, it ain't the right distro for you.

  7. #6
    Linux Guru Segfault's Avatar
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    No telling, really. It also was made with 15" 1400x1050. We do not know and our OP is not responding.

  8. #7
    Sorry for the late reply. Were there any verified case(s) of being able to shoehorn a higher resolution than what's given in the box specs? Are there any GUI apps that allow the user to modify the screen settings outside of the factory settings?

  9. #8
    Linux Newbie sarlacii's Avatar
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    Hi ciao303. You don't "shoehorn" a high resolution, any more than you wave a magic wand. A kernel graphics driver either knows how to do it, or doesn't, as it has to match the ability of the graphics hardware.

    You have to try a different driver to make such changes, as settings files that are out of spec for the currently driver will be ignored, or cause unpredictable results... likes a screen that you cannot read, which was a very common outcome a few years ago, before the various distro settings interfaces matured to include more sanity checks and the ability to roll back the settings if they didn't work.

    All the posters thus far have asked you for specific details regarding your hardware and Xorg config... I'm not sure you'll get much more help without providing those important details.

    Go well.

  10. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by sarlacii View Post
    Hi ciao303. You don't "shoehorn" a high resolution, any more than you wave a magic wand. A kernel graphics driver either knows how to do it, or doesn't, as it has to match the ability of the graphics hardware.

    You have to try a different driver to make such changes, as settings files that are out of spec for the currently driver will be ignored, or cause unpredictable results... likes a screen that you cannot read, which was a very common outcome a few years ago, before the various distro settings interfaces matured to include more sanity checks and the ability to roll back the settings if they didn't work.

    All the posters thus far have asked you for specific details regarding your hardware and Xorg config... I'm not sure you'll get much more help without providing those important details.

    Go well.

    Any information on display drivers that I may install in order to upgrade resolution quality? It's for a Dell D520.


    Thanks!!!!

    Carlos L.

  11. #10
    Linux Guru
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    Quote Originally Posted by ciao303 View Post
    Were there any verified case(s) of being able to shoehorn a higher resolution than what's given in the box specs?
    you have to understand that we're talking about physical LEDs on your actual monitor.
    i don't know "verified" but i heard of a guy who managed to "shoehorn" extra pixels (= LEDs) between 2 existing pixels on their screen. of course you need much finer tools than a shoehorn for that, but if you do it consequently across the whole screen, horizontally and vertically, you end up with double resolution.
    of course you'd have to then rewire the whole screen, rewrite the screen's firmware and graphic drivers etc.

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