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I was just wondering if anyone has any suggestions for a distro that I could use on my laptop. I do a fair about of wireless support with it, so ...
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    Linux Distro for wireless


    I was just wondering if anyone has any suggestions for a distro that I could use on my laptop. I do a fair about of wireless support with it, so I'm changing SSID's all the time, renewing IP addresses, the whole bit. I've tried Ubuntu as well as Fedora Core 3, and while both work, they seem klunky.

    The laptop is a 1ghz AMD Athlon 4, 20gig HD, S3 Savage vid card, 256megs RAM, and I'm using an Avaya World Card (Rebranded Orinoco Gold card). Hopefully I can find a light-weight distro with some decent wireless capabilities, so any help would be appreciated.

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    Linux Engineer LondoJowo's Avatar
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    I see you made it over here. I'm sure you'll get some good information

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    Quote Originally Posted by LondoJowo
    I see you made it over here. I'm sure you'll get some good information
    lol, nice to see you here Thanks for the welcome.

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    I use Gentoo. It might be a bit too much effort for some, but if you don't mind getting your hands dirty, it works great. The documentation and community are great. There's support for wireless and laptops there. I've got it all working on a old Compaq M700 PII (madwifi card). good luck.

    I suggest doing Stage 3 if you're in an hurry. Stage 1 if you want to learn more and take a long time to install.

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    Quote Originally Posted by cyklyzt
    I use Gentoo. It might be a bit too much effort for some, but if you don't mind getting your hands dirty, it works great. The documentation and community are great. There's support for wireless and laptops there. I've got it all working on a old Compaq M700 PII (madwifi card). good luck.

    I suggest doing Stage 3 if you're in an hurry. Stage 1 if you want to learn more and take a long time to install.
    I don't mind getting my hands dirty, it only helps me learn exactly what I'm doing

    I suppose this is a yes, but does Gentoo have a repository of available programs like 'yum' and 'apt' for Fedora and Debian, respectively? I did like the hands-off approach I could use for Ubuntu when it came to installing applications, but I seemed to have more troubel with Ubuntu compiling things than I did with Fedora.

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    Linux Enthusiast carlosponti's Avatar
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    my sony notebook has the prism II card and seems to work just fine plus there was some documentation on how to assign a SSID manually but that right now mine is setup to accept any SSID. i am using slackware with KDE and there was a gui tool to show you what your signal strength is.
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    Quote Originally Posted by dragonmantank
    Quote Originally Posted by cyklyzt
    I use Gentoo. It might be a bit too much effort for some, but if you don't mind getting your hands dirty, it works great. The documentation and community are great. There's support for wireless and laptops there. I've got it all working on a old Compaq M700 PII (madwifi card). good luck.

    I suggest doing Stage 3 if you're in an hurry. Stage 1 if you want to learn more and take a long time to install.
    I don't mind getting my hands dirty, it only helps me learn exactly what I'm doing

    I suppose this is a yes, but does Gentoo have a repository of available programs like 'yum' and 'apt' for Fedora and Debian, respectively? I did like the hands-off approach I could use for Ubuntu when it came to installing applications, but I seemed to have more troubel with Ubuntu compiling things than I did with Fedora.
    Gentoo uses Portage, you type emerge *program name* and it downloads the source codes and compiles it automagically It also handles dependencies and such, so it's very simple to use, and yet so much more powerful than other systems which simply download binary packages.

    You'll get your hands dirty using it, and it'll take time, but it's worth it in the end, you learn a lot and generally end up with a faster system.
    200mhz Pentium 1 with MMX, 128mb RAM, 10gb Seagate HDD. Beastly.

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    I'm taking the laptop home tonight and going to be getting my hands dirty

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    Mepis

    Try Mepis or Mandriva

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    Re: Linux Distro for wireless

    Quote Originally Posted by dragonmantank
    I was just wondering if anyone has any suggestions for a distro that I could use on my laptop. I do a fair about of wireless support with it, so I'm changing SSID's all the time, renewing IP addresses, the whole bit. I've tried Ubuntu as well as Fedora Core 3, and while both work, they seem klunky.

    The laptop is a 1ghz AMD Athlon 4, 20gig HD, S3 Savage vid card, 256megs RAM, and I'm using an Avaya World Card (Rebranded Orinoco Gold card). Hopefully I can find a light-weight distro with some decent wireless capabilities, so any help would be appreciated.
    It would matter somewhat as to your normal use of the laptop. If its a workstation then I wouldn't hesitate to put SuSE 9.3 on it. I installed the SuSE 9.3 64bit version on both AMD Turion and AMD Athlon and I had absolutely no problem at all with SuSE 9.3. And this is a particularly neat install since you can now get it on DVD vi a the CD sales guys or download.

    I haven't found a distro that will beat Mepis for wireless capability. It has come up running and locates the wireless every time. The great thing about Mepis is that you can run it as a live CD without installing and then once you see that it meets your needs you can use its install wizard to put it neatly on your hard drive.

    Knoppix is a great live CD and now DVD that can be installed with a little waggle here and there. And EVERYONE should have a Knoppix live laying around for troubleshooting - especially trouble shooting the evil empire OS.

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