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Hi All I just came across EmperorLinux . I have a similar laptop to the ones they are installing their distro on "EmperorLinux", a Sony Vaio SZ with close specs ...
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  1. #1
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    EmperorLinux feedback


    Hi All

    I just came across EmperorLinux. I have a similar laptop to the ones they are installing their distro on "EmperorLinux", a Sony Vaio SZ with close specs to their ones. The OS is supposedly based on those specs.
    Is anyone out there familiar with the distro.
    I am quite happy with my Kubuntu Edgy but this sounds ideal for my system.

    Any feedback appreciated.

  2. #2
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    Actually they are just selling laptops with a preloaded Linux distro, not an actual Emperor Linux distro. If you read the specifics you'll see you have a choice of several different distros. They simply do all of the work needed to make sure it's properly configured for the machine and call it by their name. You can do the exact same thing yourself.

    I've installed and run Slackware on a number of different laptops over the years and it only takes a few hours to install and configure everything, including adding xgl, Beryl, and Dropline Gnome and customizing everything to my tastes and machine.

    You're better off to learn how to install and configure the OS yourself and keep your money in your pocket.

  3. #3
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    I had understood that you could download the whole distro from their site!!

    So you reckon get the specs of the laptop and install the required packages and drivers one by one? using a package manager i.e synaptic or adept?
    is there a specific howto you can refer me to? I am not quite sure where to start

    I guess its the best way to gain the necessary experience and evolute from newbieness...

    thanks!

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    Start by installing the distro of your choice. That will depend on your needs, preferences, and level of knowledge. Then configure it as needed to make everything work the way you want.

    To be honest the distros I find easiest to set up are also the least newbie friendly. I can set up a Slack system in no time, but that's simply due to my experience (over 10 years) of using it. Almost any machine can be made to perform running Linux but it can require some hands-on work from the user to make it happen.

    If you're really wanting to learn Linux, install Slackware, Gentoo, or LFS (not my first choice really, been there done that), and deal with each and every configuration/hardware issue one at a time until you have it set up exactly as you want it and you will have learned a lot along the way. My personal choice is Slackware but that's such a subjective thing that everyone has to make their own choice as to a distro. There really is no one "best" distro despite what the fanboys will tell you.

    The best one is the one that works for you and that you feel comfortable with. For me it's Slack, for you it might be Gentoo (if it moves, compile it LOL), or even Ubuntu. Use what works best for you.

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    I get you concerning the distro of choice, its the first thing that i learned from the forums..

    I been hearing that Debian based are the most open-source, hence their popularity.
    I have to consider also my limited access to hi-speed internet and the inefficient downloading of bigger packages.
    Would I be able to work on building the distro on the same machine I am using kubuntu and XP, as in triple boot? or keep it separated on a cd maybe?

    at the moment I am struggling with trying to link 2 laptops, one running vista and mine on kubuntu to access internet through one of each. I was hoping to do it wirelessly.
    I tried connecting them with crossover cable and lost internet connection instantly from kubuntu machine and a hard time to configure IP on vista.

    a long way to go my friend...
    ten years experience, amazing! cant wait till i can say the same,

    I wonder where all this would be in 10 years time, any insights that a newbie cannot perceive yet?

  7. #6
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    Well, I don't know diddly about Vista, so can't help you with that. But what you need to do is have one box set up as a router. I have no idea how to do that in Vista. Or make your life easier and just buy a router.

    As for your other question, yes you can triple boot as long as you have the drive space and partitions to do it. I've run as many as a half dozen different OSs on a system at a given time.

    You can also pick up a cheap external hdd if drive space is a problem. I use one as a back up device.

    If internet connection speed is a problem for you, keep in mind that Debian based distros are very much geared towards internet connectivity for updates through the apt system.

    Well, actually all distros are as that's how you get the update files. LOL

    It looks like you already have two OSs that are working for you, Kubuntu and Vista. If you just want to tinker with others to learn, give Slackware a try. Set up another partition for it and install it. It can use the same swap partition you already have for the Kubuntu. You only need to download and burn the first two ISO files to install Slack, the rest are just source packages and such.

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