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  1. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by LegionZero View Post
    The answer is NO, actually the typical Linux (most all distros work this way) is as follows
    / = root
    /swap = scratch disk or physical memory, and
    /home = Basically "My Documents" folder

    and basically this is how it allocates them:
    root 60%
    swap 10% (or the equivalent in RAM if you have 512 in RAM it sets it at about 600MB for swap)
    home 40%

    This is the typical installation.
    Whohooo...

    ...is m understanding correct then that one of he volumes ("/") is an equivalent of the WIN Program files (system disc) and the other ("/home") one free for docs & vids & all that trash?

    Makes sense - even found the swap when playing with Ubuntu. :o)

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Majkl View Post
    Whohooo...

    ...is m understanding correct then that one of he volumes ("/") is an equivalent of the WIN Program files (system disc) and the other ("/home") one free for docs & vids & all that trash?

    Makes sense - even found the swap when playing with Ubuntu. :o)
    Yes, the "/" is called root and within it there is a folder "/bin" which contains all the programs, much like "C:\Program Files", and "/home" or "/home/username" is the same as "My Documents" in windows.
    The only difference is that in Linux "Programs" and "documents" are kept in separate partitions.

    Linux does the following:
    your fist HD is labeled hda
    and each partition is identified by adding a number
    hda1 is "/" (or root)
    hda5 is swap
    hda6 is "/home"

    What happened to hda2,hda3 and hda4? Linux does this in case you have a big hard drive and want to segment your file system even more, you could have "/usr" on hda2 and "/var" on hda3 and so on. you may want to read up on the linux filesystem structure, it is worth the read

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