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Originally Posted by bigtomrodney Just as a curiosity for myself, when you typed the above command did you leave the # hash sign in it? I typed in precisly as ...
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  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by bigtomrodney View Post
    Just as a curiosity for myself, when you typed the above command did you leave the # hash sign in it?
    I typed in precisly as it was mentioned in the post above, that is WITH the hash symbol. So - I should have written like this instead:
    urpmi unrar
    without the hash? Yes, that was probably it!

    Maybe that is also why I had problems before when reading instructions about how to do something in the console.. that I type in EXACTLY as it is written there, with those hash symbols Thanks a lot for pointing this out!

    So. if the instruction gives a symbol # I shouldn't type it, it is just an information for me, that I should type in the command as root, not as a normal user, do I understand correctly?

  2. #12
    Super Moderator devils casper's Avatar
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    So. if the instruction gives a symbol # I shouldn't type it, it is just an information for me, that I should type in the command as root, not as a normal user, do I understand correctly?
    Yes. Thats correct. # represents root user and $ represents regular user.
    It is amazing what you can accomplish if you do not care who gets the credit.
    New Users: Read This First

  3. #13
    Blackfooted Penguin daark.child's Avatar
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    So. if the instruction gives a symbol # I shouldn't type it, it is just an information for me, that I should type in the command as root, not as a normal user, do I understand correctly?
    Thats correct. The reason why there is such a convention is because typically roots shell prompt is indicated by a "#" and normal users by a "$". I personally like that convention because it cuts down on the time you have to explain to someone to start a terminal, switch, to root, enter roots password, etc.

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    devils casper and daark.child - thanks for clearing that one out.
    Now I can begin "appreciating" the convention , once I've understood it

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    Linux Engineer scrarfussi's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by scrarfussi View Post
    Great, thanks! At last something for my "level"

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