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Hi. I am using MDK 9.1 and have downloaded a Gzipped Tar of gimp-print***.tar.gz and want to unpack and install this file, in text mode. Could someone please give me ...
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  1. #1
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    Extracting Gzip Tar File


    Hi. I am using MDK 9.1 and have downloaded a Gzipped Tar of gimp-print***.tar.gz and want to unpack and install this file, in text mode. Could someone please give me the the complete rundown on how to do this?
    I am an RPM man but want to learn more about binary and source. Is a Gzipped Tar a tarball?

  2. #2
    Linux Guru lakerdonald's Avatar
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    yes, that would be a tarball. How you would proceed to extract it would be:
    Code:
    gzip -d tarball.tar.gz
    tar xvf tarball.tar
    -lakerdonald

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    Thank you for your advice. It has been recorded. I have done gzip -d tarball.tar.gz then tar xvf tarball.tar. It seems to have worked fine, in unpacking the file, but when I try configure or make, it will not comply. I have read the README and it tells me to type configure but when I do it gives me an error. I am sure that something is not fully installed. Please advice me as to my next steps, as this would be the first time I would successfully install a tarball, and not resort to an RPM.

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    post any error messages that you get when use ./configure and make && make install ..
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    Quote Originally Posted by lakerdonald
    yes, that would be a tarball. How you would proceed to extract it would be:
    Code:
    gzip -d tarball.tar.gz
    tar xvf tarball.tar
    -lakerdonald
    You can unpack with a single command, that is:
    Code:
    tar xvzf tarball.tar.gz
    or if the file has .bz2 extensions this becomes:
    Code:
    tar xvjf tarball.tar.bz2

  7. #6
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    about bunzip files you can use also :bunzip2 <filename.bz2>
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    The error on trying to run ./configure is below. I am guessing that my system is missing some software. Thank you for your help. What is flex or lex? Everything looks fine for the first twenty lines or so after running ./configure in the gimp-print directory. I can't give complete installation notes as I do not have a terminal that allows me to copy and paste to a web browser.

    ./configure: line 2196: flex: command not found
    checking for flex... lex
    checking for yywrap in -ll... no
    checking lex output file root... ./configure: line 2284: lex: command not found
    configure: error: cannot find output from lex; giving up

  9. #8
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    Looks like you need to install the Flex package.

    http://www.linux.com/guides/html/chapter06/flex.shtml

    Jeremy
    Registered Linux user #346571
    "All The Dude ever wanted was his rug back" - The Dude

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    -xvzf vs. xvzf

    This might not be fully relevant to the original topic, or it might be.

    Kiku said:
    You can unpack with a single command, that is:

    Code: tar xvzf tarball.tar.gz
    Simple question: I'd just like to know whether there is any difference between writing "tar xvzf file.tar.gz" and writing "tar -xvzf file.tar.gz" and, if there is, what does the - do?

    Thanks everyone.
    xinelo

  11. #10
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    There is no difference. Traditionally, Linux commands required a dash (-) for options. There are a few exptions, most notably tar and ps. tar works with or without the dash, but ps won't.

    Jeremy
    Registered Linux user #346571
    "All The Dude ever wanted was his rug back" - The Dude

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