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Originally Posted by NinjaRider linux doesn't work with c: and d: you can hower install it on a 2nd partion, which is the only way when using 1HD by the ...
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  1. #11
    Linux User Stefann's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by NinjaRider
    linux doesn't work with c: and d:
    you can hower install it on a 2nd partion, which is the only way when using 1HD by the way
    and windows will name it's installation partition by defaults C:
    and other partitions it finds d,e,f,g and so on
    however it wil not find the linux partition by default, i believe there some programs which grant this
    That is BS, pure and utter BS. You can in fact use linux on two HD's, in your grub.conf file add these lines to trick linux into thinking it is on the primary drive after the title.
    map (hd1,0)
    map (hd0,1)
    this also comes in handy for installing windows to the second drive making it think it is on the primary, if you want to run XP/98/DOS you really need that trick.
    Nothing is worse than ten penguins fighting over which is better, vi or emacs.
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    Finally I'm back on LF after a long while.

  2. #12
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    Re: Newbie: How to install

    Quote Originally Posted by Mic Q
    When I installed Linux, it automatically installs itself into the existing C: drive and auto-partition.

    Now that i got a new HD as my D: drive , how could I :

    1. Uninstall Linux from my C:
    (good to learn even if putting it there is of no harm)

    2. How to install Linux into D:

    3. If after installing into D: and after sometime (weeks/months) if the D: drive crash. Will the computer have a problem booting from C: (which is running WinME) as I understand that Linux installs grub/lilo that somehow manages the booting.

    4. Can we installed multiple flavours of Linux into ONE HD
    If you want to dual boot windows and linux, install windows first. then install linux. The boot loader will be able to load linux or windows from a menu at boot.

    If you have a boot loader on the first drive, and the 2nd harddrive crashes, your boot loader will still work. (If the OS on the 2nd harddrive is broken, then you can attempt to boot from it from the loader and it will fail, but you can load the other OS)

    1) Just format the partition or drive, and do whatever you want with it. If the partition was mounted as /home you don't need to delete it, since you can save all your data (preferences etc.) for when you install linux again.

    2) It depends what you mean by D. Here's how linux labels harddrives

    /dev/hda = primary master
    /dev/hdb = primary slave
    /dev/hdc = secondary master (usually CD-rom)
    /dev/hdd = secondary slave

    So if you want to install to your 2nd harddrive, (primary slave), install using /dev/hdb

    They will have numbers after the letter, they are an id for the partion. Here's an example, my /etc/fstab (file that mounts files on boot)
    Code:
    /dev/hdb5        swap             swap        defaults         0   0
    /dev/hdb1        /                reiserfs    defaults         1   1
    /dev/hdc1        /mnt/winStorage  vfat        user,auto,umask=022     0   0
    /dev/hda5        /mnt/winXP       ntfs        ro               1   0
    /dev/cdrom       /mnt/cdrom       iso9660     noauto,user,ro  0   0
    /dev/fd0         /mnt/floppy      auto        noauto,owner     0   0
    devpts           /dev/pts         devpts      gid=5,mode=620   0   0
    proc             /proc            proc        defaults         0   0
    In my case, my CD-Rom happens to be the secondary slave (/dev/hdd) but normally it is /dev/hdc

    4) yes, just partition your harddrive, each distro will need at least 1 partion to mount as root. You should be able to share the swap and home partitions between the *nix distros, if you want.

    My example above, I have linux and windows on a dual boot. linux root is on my primary slave /dev/hdb1 winXP is on my primary master /dev/hda5 and a windows fat harddrive is on my secondary master /dev/hdc1

    To get a list of your partion table, type "$ fdisk -l" in linux, (fdisk in linux works differently than the windows version.)

    Here's what it outputs on my computer:
    Code:
    [root@localhost: ~]$ fdisk -l
    
    Disk /dev/hdc: 40.0 GB, 40020664320 bytes
    255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 4865 cylinders
    Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes
    
       Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System
    /dev/hdc1               1        4865    39078081    c  W95 FAT32 (LBA)
    
    Disk /dev/hda: 163.9 GB, 163928604672 bytes
    255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 19929 cylinders
    Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes
    
       Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System
    /dev/hda1   *           1        4863    39062016    7  HPFS/NTFS
    /dev/hda2            4864       19929   121017645    f  W95 Ext'd (LBA)
    /dev/hda5            4864       19929   121017613+   7  HPFS/NTFS
    
    Disk /dev/hdb: 40.0 GB, 40020664320 bytes
    255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 4865 cylinders
    Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes
    
       Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System
    /dev/hdb1   *           1        4801    38564001   83  Linux
    /dev/hdb2            4802        4865      514080    5  Extended
    /dev/hdb5            4802        4865      514048+  82  Linux swap
    Hope that helps and makes sense

    --monkey
    --monkey

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