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I am trying to get dual monitors set up and can't seem to find some simple instructions on how to do so. I am new to Linux but am quite ...
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  1. #1
    Just Joined! ChaoticTheory's Avatar
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    Dual Monitors


    I am trying to get dual monitors set up and can't seem to find some simple instructions on how to do so. I am new to Linux but am quite capable of learning, just like to have things explained. Most of the instructions I have found seem to be geared toward experienced users and/or are years old so may not apply/may have an easier way.

    I have the following setup:

    MB - MSI 770-G45
    CPU - AMD Phenom II 1090T 6-core 3.2GHz
    GPU - Radeon HD 5770 Sapphire 100283-3L 1GB
    Monitor - Dual Gateway 23" HD Widescreens

    Any advice is appreciated, and anyone willing to detail what to do with explanations is extreamly appreciated!

    On a side note, when trying the live CD I had spiffy animations when switching desktops, how can I enable that now?

    Thanks!

  2. #2
    Linux Newbie sarlacii's Avatar
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    Talking

    Hi there ChaoticTheory...

    First up, I haven't looked at your profile, but what flavour of Linux are you using? Ubuntu, Mandriva? This will affect the type of response you get, as they all have different tools.

    However, first thing is to install the propriety ATI drivers for your card. Check out the following link:

    ATI Catalyst? Proprietary Display Driver

    This is for a Radeon HD 5x series card, running in Linux 32-bit. There are links on the same page for selecting other varients.

    Download the file, then open a terminal and:

    > su -
    password:
    > cd /directory/where/you/downloaded/the/run/file/
    > ./ati-driver-installer-10-9-x86.x86_64.run

    and follow the prompts. It used to be a lot more complicated, but video drivers have come a very long way in Linux!

    Once you have that installed, post back on your progress, and I (or someone else) will help you further. Let's call this step 1.
    Respectfully... Sarlac II
    ~~
    The moving clock K' appears to K to run slow by the factor (1-v^2/c^2)^(1/2).
    This is the phenomenon of time dilation.
    The faster you run, the younger you look, to everyone but yourself.

  3. #3
    Just Joined! ChaoticTheory's Avatar
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    Thanks sarlacii!

    And I am using Mardriva, as indicated by the forum I posted in and the psycho penguin in my Avatar I didn't see anywhere else to indicate the distro I was using, apparently I have to achieve 100 posts before I can have a sig.

    I did download that file (64bit version actually, running 64bit Spring 2010 Mandriva Free) and tried installing it. After installing the instructions said to run a certain file that should have been located in the /user/bin/ directory, but I didn't see it. Pretty sure I failed to install it as SU, so that is probably where I went wrong. (Still trying to get the hang of the Linux thing, I was quite good with Windows, but I think that can sometimes hinder learning something new.)

    Anyway, I will try reinstalling it again as SU this evening and get back with you.

  4. $spacer_open
    $spacer_close
  5. #4
    Linux Newbie sarlacii's Avatar
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    Ah, now I see the "Mandriva" penguin... soooo, I'm guessing your are using Mandriva then? LOL

    That'll make it a bit easier I suppose, as I use PClinuxOS, a Mandriva-derivative.
    Respectfully... Sarlac II
    ~~
    The moving clock K' appears to K to run slow by the factor (1-v^2/c^2)^(1/2).
    This is the phenomenon of time dilation.
    The faster you run, the younger you look, to everyone but yourself.

  6. #5
    Linux Newbie sarlacii's Avatar
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    Hi again

    Yip, the su command is used to change to another user. When you run the command as just "su -" without specifying a user, the system tries to log you in as root. The dash makes the "substitue user" a full login shell. This way you can assume the user environment of the target user, which is good when you login as root. Otherwise you just change user, but still retain your original environment.

    Anyway, if you tried the install as your normal user, the install file would not have had the correct permissions allowing it to add and modify core files and settings.

    So, give it another go, and let us know how it goes this time round.
    Respectfully... Sarlac II
    ~~
    The moving clock K' appears to K to run slow by the factor (1-v^2/c^2)^(1/2).
    This is the phenomenon of time dilation.
    The faster you run, the younger you look, to everyone but yourself.

  7. #6
    Just Joined! ChaoticTheory's Avatar
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    A little clarification if you don't mind The more I know the better I can interact and the easier I can convince others to join the Linux world

    So su is for 'substitute user'? I had assumed it stood for SuperUser, but I guess if the substitute user is not defined it becomes SuperUser (root) right?

    I assume changing the environment allows access to variables and files (similar to PATH variable perhaps?) that may not be available in the current environment, correct? What, if any, reason would there be for simply changing the user without changing the environment?

    In you command directions you have the

    >su - (preceded by the > symbol)
    password (no preceding symbol)

    Are both of those commands entered together, or is password the response of the system and thus the reason for no symbol?

    Finally, I noticed a lot of commands are preceded by " ./ ", what significance does that have? EDIT: Found out that it simply indicates to run the file from the current location, rather than looking in the PATH locations.

    Thanks!
    Last edited by ChaoticTheory; 10-01-2010 at 09:16 PM.

  8. #7
    Just Joined! ChaoticTheory's Avatar
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    OK, logged in as root (as indicated by the #) navigated to the correct folder and tried runing the file, but I get a permission denied. Any ideas?

  9. #8
    Just Joined! ChaoticTheory's Avatar
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    Figured out the driver install part! Had to "chmod -x" the file then it installed fine.

    Also found out I had to install GCC package, then ran install file and selected Build Package, which detected my distro and ran ok apparently. Rebooted and now in the process of figuring out how to set up the dual monitor part. Searching around but no luck yet, if anyone has advice it is appreciated

    Also, how can I confirm the drivers were installed?

    EDIT: Found drivers under the system control>devices

    Also used following commands to enable and set up dual monitors:

    Code:
    > aticonfig --initial=dual-head --screen-layout=left --xinerama=on
    
    > aticonfig --resolution=0,1980x1040 --resolution=1,1980x1040
    
    > aticonfig --hsync=0,30-60 --hsync=1,30-60 --vrefresh=0,30-60 --vrefresh=1,30-60
    Just made adjustments using the info I found in xorg.conf to make sure I had resolution, hsync, & vrefresh set right

    Only problem is that they are backwards - i.e. my left monitor is the right desktop and vis-a-versa. I tried running aticonfig --screen-layout=right. Also tried changing the lines

    Code:
    Screen  "aticonfig-Screen[0]-0" 0 0
    Screen  "aticonfig-Screen[0]-1" Rightof  "aticonfig-Screen[0]-0"
    in the xorg.conf with various Screen[x]-x configuration with no luck. (At one point I could move the mouse pointer infinately left across ONE screen, but got stopped at the edge going right )

    I suppose I could just switch the cables, but looking for the "right" way to do it.

    Thanks again for the help!
    Last edited by ChaoticTheory; 10-02-2010 at 12:49 PM.

  10. #9
    Linux Newbie sarlacii's Avatar
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    Hi there

    Well done on figuring out the "chmod a-x your.file" command... need to do that to make a file executable.

    The new tools that come with the Nvidia and ATI drivers are excellent. Way less fiddling than one used to have to do, which is good news for those of us who "just want it to work". LOL Although, I've done all that fiddling and more over the years... which makes you appreciate a nice GUI that does it for you all the more! LOL

    Unfortunately, I have a Nvidia card, so cannot offer specific insights into the ATI tool and card. I positioned my monitors without issue using the Nvidia tool. So that's not much help. The places to try are the ones you already have - ATI tool and xorg.conf file.

    The only thing I can suggest is to look at the order of loading of your video cards in your BIOS. Onboard vs PCI, unless you have a dual-port card, in which case you'll have to check for some setting. The order of loading was an issue for me, as I dual-booted window$ and they acted differently. Esp. when rebooting between the two without switching off first. Wierd stuff.

    Okay, as soon as you have the order sorted, then I would guess it's off to the PClinixOS control panel to enable some 3D desktop magic!
    Last edited by sarlacii; 10-02-2010 at 06:41 PM. Reason: chgn emoticon
    Respectfully... Sarlac II
    ~~
    The moving clock K' appears to K to run slow by the factor (1-v^2/c^2)^(1/2).
    This is the phenomenon of time dilation.
    The faster you run, the younger you look, to everyone but yourself.

  11. #10
    Just Joined! ChaoticTheory's Avatar
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    Thanks! More issues though :/

    Just decided to switch cables, it is a dual DVI graphics card, so figured trying to switch might be a big pain.

    When I tried turning on 3D (through Control>Hardware>Graphics Card>Options), it kicked me down to one screen. Fortunately had a copy of my good xorg.conf, so just had to copy it over the old one. Went back to the Options screen (before changing xorg) and 3d was unchecked. Tried going to Control>Hardware>Configure 3d, and it says my system does not support it. In addition, when moving windows they are slow and jerky, usually with a trail behind them.

    So where to go from here?

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