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I'm new to Linux and I want to get Mandrake 10.1 Official. I have a Pentium 4 laptop, and I want to make sure I get the right version. The ...
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  1. #1
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    Which Mandrake 10.1 do I need? x86, i386 etc...


    I'm new to Linux and I want to get Mandrake 10.1 Official. I have a Pentium 4 laptop, and I want to make sure I get the right version. The x86 is for 64-bit processors, yes? Some of the websites don't seem to say which they are selling, but I assume it matters.

    Also, if you can recommend a good site to buy from, I'd appreciate that as well.

    Thanks a bunch

  2. #2
    Xko
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    x86 (i think) is for 64 bit processors and also Power PC's so yes you're right.

    if you're in the uk try here for good priced cd's.

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    Linux Guru techieMoe's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Xko
    x86 (i think) is for 64 bit processors and also Power PC's so yes you're right.
    NO! X86_64 is *not* the same as PPC. To install on a PowerPC processor you need the "PPC" version. The new PPC chips are 64-bit but they do not follow the same architecture as AMD64's.
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    Re: Which Mandrake 10.1 do I need? x86, i386 etc...

    Quote Originally Posted by lexx11
    I'm new to Linux and I want to get Mandrake 10.1 Official. I have a Pentium 4 laptop, and I want to make sure I get the right version. The x86 is for 64-bit processors, yes?
    No, x86 is for regular 32-bit processors. Your Pentium 4 is a regular 32-bit processor. 64-bit processors (like the AMD64 or Intel Itanium) require x86_64 or IA64 distributions. If you're looking for a distro to install on a Pentium 4, use x86.
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    Xko
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    Quote Originally Posted by techieMoe
    Quote Originally Posted by Xko
    x86 (i think) is for 64 bit processors and also Power PC's so yes you're right.
    NO! X86_64 is *not* the same as PPC. To install on a PowerPC processor you need the "PPC" version. The new PPC chips are 64-bit but they do not follow the same architecture as AMD64's.
    my bad - guess you learn something new everyday!

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    Linux Guru techieMoe's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Xko
    my bad - guess you learn something new everyday!
    Yeah, sorry to be so forceful. I didn't want the poster to buy the wrong version and end up losing money... I sure hope they look again.
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    Xko
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    it's cool man - least i know whats what!

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    Linux Guru techieMoe's Avatar
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    To give a little more information on that, the X86 processors started with the Intel 8086 processor way back in 1978. They were incrementally improved (80186, 80286) and then Intel released the Intel 386 (i386) in 1980. That was then followed by he 486 (i486), the Pentium (i586), and the Pentium 3/4 (i686) and AMD's Athlon/Duron/T-bird (also i686).

    Since all these processors were based on the same architecture (basically they read/wrote 1's and 0's in the same way), and their names all contained "86", the whole family was collectively called "X86". All the X86 processors were 32-bit.

    The recent trend has been to move toward 64-bit processors, and several different architectures popped up. DEC's Alpha and Motorola's PPC chips have been 64-bit for a while, but Intel's Itanium and Xeon and AMD's Athlon64 are the new kids on the block.

    The difference between the Itanium and PPC versus the Athlon64 is that the Itanium and PPC have completely different architectures (they speak different 1 and 0 languages), whereas the Athlon64 speaks the same language as the 32-bit X86 processors, but adds 64-bit registers. Therefore the name of the Athlon64 in generic terms is "X86_64".

    Intel, not to be outdone, has since redesigned its 64-bit Xeon processors to use the same kind of architecture as the Athlon64, calling it "Intel 64-bit with Extended Memory Technoloty". Basically they couldn't say they copied AMD without being laughed at in irony (since AMD got its start by simply copying Intel's chips).

    And I'm sure that's much more information than you care to know.. but now you do. Amaze your friends.
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    Wow! Thanks for getting back to me so fast and for the all background info. It's largely due to the infectious enthusiasm of Linux users like you that I decided to swtich!

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