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Hi! I seem to have a fstab editing problem with Mandrake 10.1. I tried using Kwrite in an attempt to edit the fstab file, however, I was denied the right ...
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  1. #1
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    Editing Fstab problem


    Hi! I seem to have a fstab editing problem with Mandrake 10.1. I tried using Kwrite in an attempt to edit the fstab file, however, I was denied the right to modify the file. My question is how and where do I go to change the setting that allows me to modify the fstab file?

    Thanks

  2. #2
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    You need to be root in order to edit the file. This is one reason why it's helpful to know a text editor like Vim rather then relying on GUI editors like Kwrite. Vim can be used right in the terminal, where you can easily become root.

    You can either log in as root and edit the file using kwrite, or you can open a CLI, su to root and edit the file in Vim or Emacs. You can also issue the command

    Code:
    kwrite /etc/fstab
    From the terminal as root. This will open kwrite as root, giving you write permissions on the file using a GUI.

    Hope that helps,
    Jeremy
    Registered Linux user #346571
    "All The Dude ever wanted was his rug back" - The Dude

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by jeremy1701
    You can either log in as root and edit the file using kwrite, or you can open a CLI, su to root and edit the file in Vim or Emacs.
    'su' is the 'superuser' command, which allows anyone with the root password to take root privileges:
    Code:
    [user@system directory]$  su 
    Password:
    [root@system root]#
    Like jeremy1701 says, this can be done either in a virtual console (black screen, text only) or in an x-terminal console (command prompt window within the GUI). Exit from su with 'exit' or, in x-windows, just close the window. Notice the '$' vs. the '#' in the command prompt: that shows root privileges.
    /IMHO
    //got nothin'
    ///this use to look better

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    Quote Originally Posted by drakebasher
    'su' is the 'superuser' command, which allows anyone with the root password to take root privileges
    Close, but wrong.

    'su' is the 'switch user' command. It allows you to switch users. The default (no options) is to switch to root, but you must be in the wheel group to accomplish this. Using 'su -' switches to root and invokes root's profile (/root/.bashrc). Using 'su - user' switches to the user 'user', invoking that user's profile.
    "Time is an illusion. Lunchtime, doubly so."
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  6. #5
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    Thanks, sarumont, for the correction. I was wondering what the 'wheel' group was, so now I know.
    /IMHO
    //got nothin'
    ///this use to look better

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