Find the answer to your Linux question:
Results 1 to 10 of 10
Ok, I dont get it. I am the only user in this Mandrake 10 install. Yet, I cant DO anything in it??!!?? Why cant I just give myself total admin ...
Enjoy an ad free experience by logging in. Not a member yet? Register.
  1. #1
    Just Joined!
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    26

    About to go back to Windows!!!


    Ok, I dont get it. I am the only user in this Mandrake 10 install. Yet, I cant DO anything in it??!!?? Why cant I just give myself total admin privileges and be done with this bs??

    The "su" doesnt seem to give me any more rights in the gui so I still cant save anything I do.
    Now, for some reason I cant even access the /etc/samba folder!! No Permissions of course!.

    All I want to do is set this box up as a file server and ftp server. Everyone always says linux is the way to go , its 100 times better than windows, blah blah blah. Let me tell ya, I had windows server 2003 up and running in no time compared to this thing!! Been two days and I still cant share anything on it!!

    Is Mandrake not the distro I want??

  2. #2
    Linux Guru dylunio's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Cymru
    Posts
    4,157
    mandrake is a fine distro.

    The problem with anyone who has come from Windows (including me) is that they think linux will be the same.

    If yuo are desperate you can try and login as root with root as the username and rootpass as the password.
    I do not think this is the best way to go though since you can mess a lot up

    dylunio
    Registered Linux User #371543!
    Get force-get May The Source Be With You
    /dev/null
    /dev/null2

  3. #3
    Just Joined!
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    26
    Well thats one of the problems...it wont let me log in as root!! It doesnt give me the option to type in a username. instead it gives me the only available username that i created and I can only select that name then type its password. Before I select the username, I cant type anything. So I cant log in as root.

  4. #4
    Linux Guru dylunio's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Cymru
    Posts
    4,157
    IRRC there are options in Mandrake Controle center to deal with this;

    dylunio
    Registered Linux User #371543!
    Get force-get May The Source Be With You
    /dev/null
    /dev/null2

  5. #5
    Just Joined!
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    98
    By default they ftp server should be running on the system.
    The file server will require samba if being used as a windows share drive.

    This isn't difficult but can take some time to understand correctly.

    Mandrake is a "newbie friendly" distro... meaning it won't let you shoot yourself in the foot unless you REALLY REALLY try. Logging into the gui as root is often very dangerous (similar to what windows does) If you don't know what you are doing, you can point and click your system away. Also running as root is the only way you can get malicious programs on your computer without you knowing it (as you found out normal users can't really do much of anything).

    In order to log in to the gui as root on Mandrake, i normally setup the start sequence to boot to the console, not a window manager. from there you can login as root. from there type
    Code:
    startx
    to start the gui.

    I'm sure there are other ways around it, thats just the method that i follow. Also, i thought when doing something that requires root, that mandrake asks for the root password? am i incorrect in that?

    If you need any help configuring samba, or any other features of the FTP server, don't hesitate to ask.

    Be warned, if you do we may ask you to display some config files or edit them manually , but i really think it won't be too hard.

  6. #6
    Just Joined!
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    26
    thanks for trying to help.
    first, I'm not a complete moron when it comes to linux. well, lets just say windows isn't my first choice in an os, this is my first experience with linux but it seems to be quite basic on the inside.
    anyway, samba is installed. I know how to share what I want to but it's not letting me save the smb.conf so I cant make any changes to it.
    I haven't even begun to play with the ftp server part of it yet so thats another issue all together.

    If I'm already Logged in as a user, how can I get admin permissions?
    because once I log out it doesnt let me choose to log in as root. or how can I set it to boot to a command line?

  7. #7
    Just Joined!
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    98
    The very last reply to this post tells how to log in as root. Hope this helps some, and good luck.


    http://www.linuxforums.org/forum/post-147862.html

  8. #8
    Just Joined!
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    26
    Yeah that doesnt work either because when you try to add the user "root" it says user already exists please choose another name!
    Oh well...

  9. #9
    Linux Newbie jeickal's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Switzerland
    Posts
    114
    Look, don't try to log in as root. If you need root access to modify a specific file (like smb.conf), log in as normal user as usual, and do the following:
    Open a shell terminal. type the command:
    su -
    It asks you for your root password. Then you are root just fo this terminal. From there, you can edit your file with your favorite txt editor, for ex: with gedit, type this:
    gedit /etc/samba/smb.conf

    Now you can save smb.conf without permission problem.
    From this terminal you can do anything that require root access.
    But NEVER log in your desktop as root. I'm not saying it won't work, just saying if you take this habit, you'll regret it someday...

  10. #10
    Linux Newbie
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    New York
    Posts
    150
    I wouldn't recommend relying on Linux for anything important if you aren't that experienced with it. Instead, I'd stick with a windows machine for a while and ease into the change by experimenting with live distributions such as Knoppix, which allow you to run the entire OS from the CD-ROM. This way you can play around with things with little chance of wrecking the system.

    Root privileges work best from console, since you can see exactly what programs you are running. GUIs deal with things behind your back, so it's easier for you to overlook the side effects of your actions. Some desktop managers will prevent you from logging in as root for this reason, but you can always switch to a true virtual console (via ctrl+alt+ F1 through F6) and get in as the superuser from there.

    Alternatively, you can always avoid logging in as root, and simply 'su' anytime you need root privileges. This can be done within the GUI without a problem. Just open up a terminal emulator (such as "Konsole"), type su, enter your password, and then type the name of whatever application you want to run, such as kedit or another text editor.


    Question for those more experienced than I am: Once in an application, is there any way to gain root status without restarting it?
    \"Nifty News Fifty: When news breaks, we give you the pieces.\" - Sluggy Freelance

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •