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Originally Posted by bullethead21 Anyhow, for those that want to login as root using Mandriva 2007, just goto your control center then open a console. Navigate to the etc/kde/kdm/ directory ...
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  1. #11
    Linux Guru antidrugue's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bullethead21
    Anyhow, for those that want to login as root using Mandriva 2007, just goto your control center then open a console. Navigate to the etc/kde/kdm/ directory and edit the kdmrc file.

    You just need to change one line to "allowrootlogin=true"

    Save your changes and your good to go.
    Well, of course it is different if you use KDE. I wrongly assumed you were using Gnome.

    Thanks for posting the solution back, I'm sure it will interest others as well.
    "To express yourself in freedom, you must die to everything of yesterday. From the 'old', you derive security; from the 'new', you gain the flow."

    -Bruce Lee

  2. #12
    kbk
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    With KDE couldn't you use the root file system thing (where you login as root to, say, move files from one hdd to another) and then do things that way? I hope that made sense..

  3. #13
    Linux Guru smolloy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Juan Pablo
    It's just a suggestion, take it easy.
    In my opinion this one of the best and friendlies forums out there.
    Nobody will miss you anyway.
    Agreed. The original poster was just asked why he wanted to do something normally considered unwise and you came back with a lot of attitude. Perhaps you would rather this were a forum full of mindless drones who simply answered the users question without giving him/her the friendly advice that what they are planning to do might not be wise? I'd rather one of the experts told me that I could be about to make a mistake, rather than just let me do it.
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    hey guys i am kinda new to linux so i was wondering why it is such a bad idea to login as root. I am running a personal desktop not a server or anything and no1 else is using this computer. But let's say i want to do something it's silly to go to cmd prompt and write su and do it when i could just login as root and do everything just like that. the point here is that not logging in as root won't stop you mess up your system , right ?

    i wanna hear more advice on this. I think this is a great forum for beginners btw

  6. #15
    Linux Guru smolloy's Avatar
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    Running as a regular user stop you doing things by mistake. If you accidentally type in the wrong command as a regular user, it cannot damage the operating system that badly (you may lose personal files though). Entering the wrong command as root can have catastrophic consequences to the operating system, and all the data stored on the machine.

    Also, whilst browsing the web, it will be impossible for spyware, etc. to install itself onto your machine without you knowing. The worst it could do would be in infect your home directory, but without having access to any higher functionality. If you are running as root, however, you leave yourself open for anything to be installed (or even to install itself without you knowing!) with full permissions and priviledges -- obviously very undesirable.

    After a while you will find yourself using su to become root less and less, and this is simply because you will need to configure your system less and less as time goes on, and as you get things running the way you want to. I really can't see any good reason for me to run as root graphically, and I like the fact that I am protected from my own mistakes!!! When using su to become root, I normally have it in the back of my head that I am doing something "special" and should, therefore, be very careful and think things through properly.
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    good enough for me ! thanks for the reply.

    Main reason i want to login as root is because i want to delete a Directory ! i looked it up and tried to use rm -R directory name but then it will ask me if i want to delete the specific file in the directory for the all the files ! imagine how many times i have to press y and then enter ! On the other hand if i login as root i can use the GUI to just delete the dir.

    is there something i am missing ? an easier way or something ?

  8. #17
    Linux Guru smolloy's Avatar
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    To do this quickly and easily use "rm -rf directory-name/*". This will recursively remove the files from all the directories (including the directories themselves) below the directory name you specify. Of course you can only remove files that you have the correct permissions to remove, so you won't be able to remove any files that are owned by root unless you have logged in as root.

    Please please please be careful running rm as root, especially when you use the * wildcard character. The rm command is not like the windows recycle-bin -- there is no way to recover files deleted using rm (unless you pay some data recovery company hundreds of dollars!)
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  9. #18
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    I'm not a knewby

    I work for a big company 6000 persons.
    I'm in charge of a firewall a mail server and a web server.
    They are all on Linux Mandrake.
    I login as root and use kde as root (since 7 years).
    I acces my servers via a ssh tunneling VNC.
    I think that mandrake should wake up.
    Linux expert nead a GUI more then anybody.

    My mail server is
    vnc+postfix+postgrey+amavis-new+clamav+bitdefender+apache+horde
    +courier+proftpd+mysql+php+webmin+...etc
    My firewakk is
    iptables+squid+squidguard+ssh+tc+webmin+....rtc

    If I don't use a GUI all those text files to edit nead to be
    in my brain... I use root login with KDE to administer these server
    via VNC/SSH.

    For me a root login with kde is a must not a option.

    Wake up Mandrake.

    Startcole

  10. #19
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    Smile There's an easy way to configure the login manager before you actually log in

    On the Mandriva 2007 login window, there're three buttons. Click the Action button, it pops up a small window on which you select "Configure the login manager", and from there you can configure to allow root login in GUI!

  11. #20
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    REPLY: how do i login as root

    to login as a root u need to create root account right from the installation of Mandrivia or u log on to system manager. if u create an account as root the root password would be required when u want to switch user from the administrator by using su - and typing in ur root password.

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