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Hi, I recently installed Mandrakelinux 10.1; and I'm dual-booting it with a Windows partition. All of my music files are stored in my Windows side, and in Linux I can ...
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  1. #1
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    Write access for windows files


    Hi, I recently installed Mandrakelinux 10.1; and I'm dual-booting it with a Windows partition. All of my music files are stored in my Windows side, and in Linux I can view them, but I do not get write-access so I can't edit the filenames or tags. Is there anything I can do to make it possible to gain write access to the files in my Windows partition?

    Thanks,

    SomethingGood.

  2. #2
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    I asume that your windows partitions are ntfs. This has to be the case bacause Mandrake by default ebables the user to write to fat32 partition, so you must have ntfs. To gain write access to the ntfs partition you have to recompile the kernel and enable "ntfs write support". This is not recomended because the ntfs write support in linux is still experimental so do it at your own risk. I've tried this at my home and still cant write on ntfs partition so now everything is linux partitions. When you recompile the kernel in /etc/fstab insert the option "rw" for the partition you want to write in. or just convert the ntfs to fat32 so you wont have to bother with all this (if you want to experiment, like me, try recompiling the kernel).
    Regards.

  3. #3
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    Flame windows

    All because windows wasnt happy with the already 85 different filesystems, they had to have one of thier own. I made the same mistake ended up just getting Point2play from transgaming.org. It uses its own "fake" drive to install to on your /home directory or synthesis of.

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  5. #4
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    Well, a more "dirty" solution would be that you created an extra partition on your harddrive that is FAT32, where you would be able to have RW access from both you Linux and WinOS. Where you would store files that you need access to from both OS.
    As I said, it is a not recomended solution, but a working one.

  6. #5
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    Sorry but I have just installed Mandrake 10.1 on my xp pro box and it does not allow users access to the fat32 partitions by default.
    Of course I may be wrong( often am) but if it was the case then I wouldn't be tearing my hair out now.
    Assuming the filesystem is ntfs is not commonly true either as many unix users seem to .
    I have been troubleshooting and working with XP boxes since they first issued it and I have yet to find an ordinary windows user who has opted to use ntfs after any upgrade, as they will have been quite happy with fat32 before, even newly installed systems seem to be using fat32.

  7. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by billybeag
    Sorry but I have just installed Mandrake 10.1 on my xp pro box and it does not allow users access to the fat32 partitions by default.
    Of course I may be wrong( often am) but if it was the case then I wouldn't be tearing my hair out now.
    Assuming the filesystem is ntfs is not commonly true either as many unix users seem to .
    I have been troubleshooting and working with XP boxes since they first issued it and I have yet to find an ordinary windows user who has opted to use ntfs after any upgrade, as they will have been quite happy with fat32 before, even newly installed systems seem to be using fat32.
    Giving access to your fat32 partition is really easy todo. Can you post the output of these 2 command :
    Code:
    fdisk -l
    cat /etc/fstab
    This will give us the filesystem under your linux box, as well as the option to mount it.
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