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It's a Netgear WG311 v2 802.11g card. I was able to determine that it was using the acx100 chipset, so I started the Craig ACX100 guide. But I just kept ...
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  1. #11
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    It's a Netgear WG311 v2 802.11g card. I was able to determine that it was using the acx100 chipset, so I started the Craig ACX100 guide. But I just kept running into problem after problem. The last one was "wireless extensions disabled" when I tried to compile the driver.

    No idea how to turn it on.

    Thaks for the help.

  2. #12
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    BTW, it's a PCI card.

  3. #13
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    IIRC, that card *should* work out of the boxen with MDK. Mine did.

    Jeremy
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  4. #14
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    Cool. What version are you using of MDK?

  5. #15
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    I'm using 10.1 Official.
    Registered Linux user #346571
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  6. #16
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    Ok, thanks. I'll check it out.

  7. #17
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    rjcarr, sorry to hear you're still having trouble, but if you get mad and upset about hardware issues, get mad and upset with the manufacturers of your hardware. It is they, not the Linux operating system that is making your life difficult by not providing you with Linux drivers which most could do with a little effort. Often, if there is a way to make hardware work with Linux, it's going to be the Linux community that has toiled to make it possible in spite of the manufacturers indifference.
    I had hardware that wouldn't work with Linux when I first made the switch so I understand your frustration. It gets easier though, so stick with it.
    Linux Mint + IceWM Registered:#371367 New Members: click here

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    I kind of have to disagree. I don't think hardware companies are completely indifferent, I just think that it is VERY difficult to deal with releasing software to the Linux community. In order for a company to release software that will work on any Linux distro, they have to release the source code. Then they get screwed because they put a ton of money into developing their software, and any other company can use it in the same way without having to put in an investment. Of course, one of the biggest pushes in the Linux community is to get more source code released, but I can see how it would be a bad business model. There is no way to make a LOT of money off software that anyone can have for free.

    The only other option is to release compiled version for some of the majors distros, but even that is a problem with the big flavor of the month problem with releases. NVidia has done a good job with their drivers, but most hardware companies don't have those kind of resources... Yeah... that was fun. I'll quit talking now.

  9. #19
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    Hi Dan. You are right. But maybe I am to blame for choosing an OS that I know hardware vendors don't support? The easiest way around this in my simple view of the problem, is to build in support for native Windows drivers. Mount CD, point to file. Linux does the rest.

    Problem solved.

    I said it was a simple view, right?

  10. #20
    Trusted Penguin Dapper Dan's Avatar
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    That's kind of the way that the ndiswrapper thing does that I pointed you to. I think this is something we're gonna see more of.

    For me, I just accepted the fact that some of my hardware was not compatible, and researched what works and went out and bought it. I realize this sometimes is not an option for those on a tight budget, but for me, it was a choice between the short term disadvantage of having to buy a few new hardware pieces as opposed to the long term disadvantages, aggravation and cost of staying with Windows. I have found the short term disadvantages I suffered to be well worth it.
    Linux Mint + IceWM Registered:#371367 New Members: click here

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