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Hello ppl, I'm a Linux newb, running Mandrake 9.0, finally could xcape Mr. BG's claws. I can't get Linux to recognize my Kingston's Usb Key. I explore the HD using ...
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  1. #1
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    USB Key


    Hello ppl, I'm a Linux newb, running Mandrake 9.0, finally could xcape Mr. BG's claws.
    I can't get Linux to recognize my Kingston's Usb Key. I explore the HD using Konqueror and when getting to the removable device and clicking on it nothing happens. Weird thing is that after I installed the OS, I plugged my key and could see the files!
    Oh...another thing. I didn't know that there HAD to be a root user. When I installed Mandrake, I was asked to choose a username, and a password, but I wrote my usr name and left the pwd space blank. Now, there are many times that I wanna change something within the sys and can't do it becouse I have to loggin as root......and I don't have any root pwd. Is there any way to activate it?
    Thanks to all!
    Mariano.

  2. #2
    Linux Newbie jeickal's Avatar
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    Re: USB Key

    Welcome mariano00
    Quote Originally Posted by mariano00
    when getting to the removable device and clicking on it nothing happens
    This is probably because your USB key is not mounted. But before we tell you more about it, it is critical that you remember your root password
    You don't need to "activate" you root user. It's there. During the installation, it asked you for a user, but also for your root password. You really don't remember what you typed? Maybe you just hit enter leaving it blank? When you open the MCC (Mandrake Control Center) it will ask you for your root password, try pressing enter see if it lets you in.

    If you really don't remember your root password you will have to do a recovery procedure. Let us know if you could remember it. Then we'll guide you to get your USB key back. Otherwise we'll see about the recovery procedure.

  3. #3
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    Thanks for your help!
    I went to the Mandrake Control Center. I tried to install a new program, changed the screen resolution, and wasn't asked for my password!
    But anyway, after installing Mandrake, the next day or so, I could use my USB Key! That's the strange thing, I used it without problems, I found it with the disc and cd-rom icon and it was fine, but today, doing the same thing as before, nothing happens, It's as if the USB Key was empty (it isn't, I checked it with another PC).
    Well, thanks again.

  4. #4
    Linux User sheds's Avatar
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    It seems that your USB key is mounted only sometimes when linux boots up. Check the fstab file in /etc and search google on what line to add to be able to automatically mount it when linux boots up. I am sorry for not specifying the line but i gave my USB key to someone else and so i haven't performed this procedure in a while now.

  5. #5
    Linux Newbie jeickal's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mariano00
    I went to the Mandrake Control Center. I tried to install a new program, changed the screen resolution, and wasn't asked for my password!
    So I believe you logged in as root. Which is not such a great idea, but anyway, let's focus on your current problem.
    /etc/fstab right, but for a newbie, 1st I'd suggest if you don't see your USB key, try unpluging it and pluging it back. If it still doesn't work go to the Mandrake Control Center, then mount point, then partition. There you see your hard disk, and you should see a 2nd tab for your USB key, should be something like "sda1". click on it. Then right under, look for a "mount" button. If you have one, click on it. If you don't, click on the "mount point" button and write the directory you want to see you USB data mounted (typically /mnt/sda1). you might have to create this directory before. Then press mount.
    Now you can go to /mnt/sda1 and see your stuff from the USB key

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    erratic mounting problems

    I have had this same problem with usb keys of varying types, usb and internal zips and floppies. there seems to be no pattern whatsoever - sometimes they work but often not.
    most of the time i get an "unable to mount" message and often it shows icons with the appropriate names but does not recognise if its a folder or a text file. I also get "attempt to login failed" messages alot.
    I've used the mount points feature of mandrake control center (in 10.1) as well as checking the fstab manually without success or change in erratic results. my fstab has not changed in a week, but I've had greatly varying results consistently.
    we seem to be facing similar issues... i feel your pain
    I know this post does not help your problem... but you're not alone.

    good luck
    cp

  7. #7
    Linux Newbie jeickal's Avatar
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    OK guys look, I've been through the same problems some time ago, and I definitely fixed it by doing it all by hand. And this is frustrating because I can't see what you see so I wish I could just grab your keyboard and show you... All right, I'm gonna try to explain how I do it.

    I never found how does Mandrake chooses its automatic mount point. Sometimes it's /mnt/hd, then next time it mounts it is /mnt/hd2, then /mnt/hd3 and then back to /mnt/hd. Very annoying.
    So, 1st, on a terminal (as root), type this:
    Code:
    tail -f /var/log/messages
    Note that you need to have syslog started (it is by default), check in the Mandrake services.
    Here you will see "live" what Mandrake is doing. Then plug your USB key. Now if it doesn't automount, look at the name of the device you see in the terminal, and in another terminal (still as root) type:
    Code:
    mount /dev/sda1 /mnt/sda1
    Assuming in this ex that the device is sda1 and I created before the /mnt/sda1 folder.
    This is mounting the device sda1 (the USB key) in the folder /mnt/sda1 (or type whatever you want, just make sure the folder exist and is empty)
    Now you can see how stuff gets mounted like this:
    Code:
    df -h
    Filesystem Size Used Avail Use% Mounted on
    /dev/hda1 5.8G 4.1G 1.5G 74% /
    /dev/hda6 68G 47G 21G 70% /home
    none 252M 16K 252M 1% /tmp
    /dev/sda1 423M 109M 292M 28% /mnt/sda1 <== You can see my USB key here
    From there you might have permission problem, like not being able to write on the key, but I'll let you try this and come back with the kind of problem you're experiencing.
    Now when you're done, close all nautilus windows or terminal where you might be in /mnt/sda1 (still in my example), and unmount the USB key:
    Code:
    umount /mnt/sda1
    If you get a "busy" message, make sure you closed all your nautilus/konqueror windows and that you are not in this folder on a terminal.
    OK that might sounds complicated, but it's not really once you understand the principle.
    And then you know exactly what the system is doing.

  8. #8
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    Ok, I see that I'm not alone!!! I tought I was the worst Linux user of all times hehehe, well, I have a full weekend ahead, so I'm gonna try our all these tips and see what I can do. I'll get back on monday or tuesday. Thanks ppl! I'll be back.....(well, somebody had to use that phrase again!, or is it banned forever!? :roll: )

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