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I run Mandrake 10 on my desktop, and I'm fairly new to linux. I navigate by feel so I can only give you a vague description of what I did ...
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  1. #1
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    Monitor problems


    I run Mandrake 10 on my desktop, and I'm fairly new to linux. I navigate by feel so I can only give you a vague description of what I did to my computer :S

    I bought a used monitor and the colour was screwed up. So I looked and the system still had my old monitor listed in the Hardware list. I went to change the monitor settings and saw that my "new" monitor was in the list, so I changed the settings by clicking on the name in the list.

    However, now when I boot I get wavey lines accross my monitor so i can't see anything, and therefore can't get in to change the settings back. Is there a way to undo this? Everything shows up fine on the monitor until it hits the login screen then I can't see anything.

    Thanks
    G

  2. #2
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    You get the login screen right after X windows is started, that is, when you go from text-mode to graphics-mode. To do anything, you will need to work in text mode, either to repair your configuration by un-changing what you changed, or else by running the automatic configuration program, which may or may not improve things.

    Hopefully, you can get a text screen if, when the screen goes wavy, you press ctrl-alt-F4. I'm not sure what text editor you have available, but hopefully you will have nano or pico or joe. I'm sure you have vi, but the others are more intuitive. In any case, the file to edit is (i'm pretty sure) /etc/X11/xorg.conf. While you are editing, I'd also suggest you make a change to normally boot to text mode at least until your graphics is working 100%. Do that by editing /etc/inittab. You will look for one of the first lines that does not start with a '#' and which looks something like:
    Code:
    id:5:initdefault:
    change the 5 to a 3.

    When your xorg.conf file is ready for testing, press ctrl-alt-F7 to get to the wavy graphics screen and then ctrl-alt-backspace to kill X windows. X windows may restart automatically, otherwise just enter the command 'startx' to do the job manually. Repeat as required.
    /IMHO
    //got nothin'
    ///this use to look better

  3. #3
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    OK, I can get to the text screen by pressing ctrl+alt+f4, but then I don't know what to do. I tried just typing " /etc/X11/xorg.conf" and hitting enter and I get an error. I need more details please.

    I've tried typing "Help", and I get the end of a long list of commands just like in oldschool dos, but unlike dos I don't know how to display the list a bit at a time so that it's actually useful.

    I'm posting from a bootable version of Knoppix, I read that it has utilities for recovery of other systems, could this be a way to fix it, and if so how?

    G

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  5. #4
    Linux User martinfromdublin's Avatar
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    Hi Gordafurious,

    A newbie's work-around on this is to re-insert your install disk and selct installation. Next, take the option to 'upgrade' and let the install procedure run (takes 10-20 minutes). When it boots up, your files will be as they were but as Linux 'pairs' the PC and monitor at install time, it should set up whichever monitor you had attached at the time, so make sure you have the one you want to use attached.

    I know I'm only a newbie but this worked for me and got an old Gateway 17" monitor working in all my Linux distros. Before that, when I posted the problem, I was getting suggestions like what you are, not to put those ideas down, but if you want a short-cut, this is one and it should work.

    Please post back here if sucessful.

    Martin,

    Dublin, Ireland
    LINUX: Where do you want to go.......Tomorrow!

    Registered Linux user 396633

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    I tried using the CD to fix it, but alas, it didn't seem to work. I had high hopes for that suggestion. Thanks anyway.

    At least I can get all my files with Knoppix if worst comes to worst ... sigh

    G

  7. #6
    Linux User martinfromdublin's Avatar
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    I'm afraid the only other suggestion is to boot into Knoppix and move all your valuable files to another partiton or drive, then reformat follwed by a clean install of Mandriva. I had to do that once before when I 'tweaked' the system too much.

    martin,

    Dublin, Ireland
    LINUX: Where do you want to go.......Tomorrow!

    Registered Linux user 396633

  8. #7
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    Is there any way to repair one of the files from Knoppix to fix my monitor? And while we're on the subject, I can open files from other harddrives, but I can't save files anywhere, not even to my USB key from Knoppix. It says I don't have permission.

    Maybe I need to post in a different forum for these answers. But I'm getting sidetracked, what I want is a way to repair my monitor settings in Mandrake. Please help!

  9. #8
    Linux Newbie sabin's Avatar
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    Maybe there's a thing you haven't tried : setting mandrake up so that you use a generic monitor.
    Of course, you'll have configured that generic monitor to be using parameters your current monitor can handle.

    For this, booting with your mandriva distro, chose "upgrade", and after the usual ten minutes, it will display a list of the system element's configuration. There will be a button to click to see the graph card's config, a button to see the sound card config, a button to see the network config, etcetera.
    Click the graphical card's settings, and there you can chose a monitor in the list of the monitors. Chose "generic", maybe you can ask for more details (or maybe not). But anyway, with a "generic" monitor, your mandriva should boot and then show you a perfectly neat screen, or I hope so.

    One thing too might have importance, old monitors won't like resolution changes or might have trouble showing certain resolution. I don't mean 800x600 vs 1024x768, I mean that dpi thingie. In xorg.conf (/etc/) you can see a dpi line in it. If it's neither 75 nor 90, consider setting it back to one of the two values.

    For Knoppix, to edit files or save them, I have an idea. But yet I can't promise it will work, I never used knoppix. Here's the idea : try to operate as root. You can log in as root, or in a konsole, run su, provide your root password, and then run the program manager (I don't know what is its name for Knoppix, but if there's a KDE, run "konqueror"), and then inside you will have root priviledges, probablty meaning you can edit and save all files.

    Good luck

  10. #9
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    You are amazing, That totally did the trick. I even figured out my Knoppix issues ... all in all a good week.

    Thanks everyone for your suggestions.

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